5
Feb

The ‘Off Recipe’ Advantage

pasta-pot-photo

By: Donna Taglione, Vice President

I love to cook but I hate to bake.

I can break out in a cold sweat at the thought of baking a batch of cookies, but my BFF Chili with its 25+ ingredients is one of my “go-to” winter meals. Seems weird, right?

Cooking and baking both need bowls and tools, pots and pans. Both have recipes. But cooking allows for personal expression–a little more of this and a little less of that is OK. Most of the time it is more art and less science. Take the garlic out of chili because it gives you indigestion and no one is any the wiser unless you tell them – it’s still chili.

Adding some heat to “kick it up a notch” (thank you Emeril) takes a knowledge of ingredients and makes the experience of cooking and eating more individualized.

Baking, on the other hand, isn’t just science – it’s chemistry. Alter the ingredients or recipe by even a little and all your hard work could end up in the garbage can when the cookie drops come out of the oven like flat, over-done pancakes (trust me on that one).

As I was cooking dinner on Sunday, I was thinking about this blog post and decided maybe that’s why I’m drawn to qualitative research. While I rarely cook with a recipe, I would never bake without one. The flexibility and creativity I find in meal preparation is much like the flexibility I find when conducting qualitative market research.

Just as I like adding a little more of this and a little less of that in my meals, during an in-home I can go “off recipe” and let the consumer guide the discussion. Of course, I am well aware of all the ingredients needed to get to the end result. But does it matter how we get there? Will a little more of this and a little less of that hurt the outcome? For the most part it doesn’t, as long as you don’t forget any of the key steps.

With qualitative, just like in cooking, it’s often the occasions you go “off recipe” that make the difference between the same old thing, and something that turns a “standard” into the dish that everyone really enjoys.

So next time a qualitative project comes up and you want to stick with the same ingredients and follow the tried and true recipe, try to find a way to add your unique flavor to the method or topic.

You never know, you just may like it!