24
Aug

5 Myths About Being a Moderator

5 myths about moderators

By: Kea Wheeler, Senior Project Director

1: Travel for work = vacation

Being a moderator and traveling for work, people often comment on how “lucky” I am to travel for my job.  It is true that I am lucky to have a career that I enjoy, but being “lucky” because of my work travels is an overstatement.

When I travel for a project, I usually work 9-12 hours per day inside of a temperature controlled, windowless facility. After my interviews are complete, I stagger out into the night air in search of food and beverages and then hurry back to my hotel room to write-up my notes for the day…then repeat. I know what you’re thinking “wait, that sounds like…work.” Well it is work.  And this cycle could last for 1 day or up to 10 days if I am participating in a clinic. So travel yes; vacation it is not.

2: Traveling gets you away from the office

When I relate my tale of what it is truly like for me to travel for work, I often hear “well at least you are away from the office.” With the advent of smart phones, and other mobile devices, is anyone ever truly away from the office? Not really. And this holds true for moderators too. Just because I am not physically positioned at my desk in our office building, does not mean that I am “away” from the office.

Once back at my hotel in the evenings, I am answering all of the emails that I received while I was conducting interviews. The work back home doesn’t stop while I’m out on the road and neither do the email/text notifications.

3: Moderating is easy

This is my favorite moderator myth.  There are some who look from the outside and see me “talk” for a living. But moderating is much more than simply talking to someone. It is engaging in conversation about topics that consumers may not even know they could converse about at length. When I conduct interviews about a topic or product that consumers take for granted, such as a cleaning product, my interviewees wonder, “What is there to talk about for an hour?” Once we are engaged in the conversation and our time together has expired, respondents are shocked to realize that we did, indeed, talk for an hour.

I will say it is easier to speak to someone about a concept vehicle, but it takes skill to keep a somewhat natural conversation going about toilet cleaner.

Besides maintaining a conversation, my job also entails observing what is happening around me and determining my next move.  In all things, body language is important. And as a good moderator, this should always be taken into account. Body language tells me when I need to follow-up on a response, when I need to ask another respondent what their position is on a subject, or when I should let a line of questioning lapse until the respondent feels more comfortable speaking on a certain topic.

So yes, I talk about everything from consumer concept vehicles to toilet cleaners, but if I didn’t also observe what is happening around me, I would only be getting part of the conversation.

4: Report writing is a breeze

I once had a colleague tell me that every time he tries to write a qualitative report, it goes something like this, “I write some people said this, some people said that…and then I die a little inside.”  I don’t know if I would equate qualitative report writing to the withering of your entire existence, but for those accustomed to reading tabs and writing reports from the data, qualitative reports can be daunting.

The hardest part about writing a qualitative report as a moderator is trying to make sense of a ton of unstructured data. Not only are you looking for the answers to your questions and behavioral themes, but you are also searching for any context that may be important for a client to understand.

And while a quantitative report is sometimes rated on how many charts and different data cuts can be obtained, a qualitative report is judged by its ability to tell a story in the briefest possible manner.  Think more twitter post, than blog. And while not as soul crushing as my colleague indicates, you may just be a little more bruised after your report is finished.

5: We don’t like numbers

I call foul on this. I like numbers.  Numbers are necessary as they help to get a story across to a large number of people.  This will never change. But what I will say is that in today’s world, you need both numbers and the human context behind the numbers to truly make a difference. Think about all the times you hear people say “I don’t want to be just another number.” It’s not that they don’t want to be counted. What they don’t want is for companies to treat them as only a widget to be tallied and tossed into a heap of others to be tabulated and charted. They want to be regarded as a person.

Qualitative helps to define the humanity behind the numbers. And once you can define the humanity, that’s where change can truly occur in how a company produces and markets their products and services. Once this change occurs, consumers flock to these companies as one that “gets” them.  And that will add numbers to a company’s consumer base, its likes, its shares, and its sales – all numbers. Who doesn’t like that?

While there are certain myths about my job as a moderator that I have to contend with, I still love what I do. And I’ll admit sometimes the stars do align and I can tack on a few extra days to schedule a vacation after a project is complete. Not as glamorous as all the myths, but the truth never is.

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16
Jun

Top 3 Reasons Why Consumers are Rejecting Autonomy

Top 3 reasons why consumers are rejecting autonomy

By: Greg Swando, Senior Research Director

Autonomy.

This one word is the beginning of the current automobile industry’s disruption, as OEMs across the world race to incorporate various levels of autonomy and services into their vehicles.  New features such as Forward Collision Warning, Lane Keeping Assistance, and Emergency Braking, among others, have been emerging on the market and becoming more commonplace across vehicle portfolios and advertising campaigns.

But what exactly do consumers think about these new Automated Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS)?

While today’s consumers will see more advances in vehicle technology over the next five years than in the past 50, their rate of technology adoption may be slower to respond, as found by the report “A Consumer-Centric Journey Towards Autonomy”. This report was developed by our automotive team in partnership with SBD and Gamivation, in order to understand the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead in the journey toward next generation autonomous vehicles.

Our report revealed that there are 3 main reasons consumers are not only nervous about the new ADAS features, but may also be rejecting them entirely:

  1. Today’s driver assistance systems are being underutilized and/or misunderstood
  2. A significant number of current ADAS owners find the technology distracting and even irritating
  3. Many consumers reject needing any assistance–and are against giving up control of their vehicle

These and other surprising insights were revealed through the study, including how consumers are viewing the implementation and use of current ADAS features in vehicles. The types of consumers most open and receptive to these features, and those who are more likely to be suspicious or frightened by the new technology, are also revealed in the report, along with why consumers are reacting in these ways.

Our Automotive team and partners will help you learn how your competitors are implementing autonomous features and compare and contrast consumer viewpoints among each of these systems. After determining these points, our team can map out best-practice guidelines to differentiate your features as part of your overall brand, and help to make the consumers’ transition to autonomous features a smoother ride.

To find out more about “A Consumer Centric Journey Towards Autonomy” click here.

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8
Jun

How Long Are People Willing to Wait for the Tesla Model 3?

How Long are Consumers Willing to Wait for the Tesla Model 3?By: Kimberly Doherty, Senior Project Manager; Pam Cunningham, Research Manager

With 373,000 deposits in for the Tesla Model 3, questions are circulating around consumers’ expectations: How long do they plan to wait for delivery? What features do they expect the vehicle to come equipped with, and what do they want to add on? In search of answers, we reached out to our MyDrivingPower (MDP) community members who put down a deposit to uncover their insight and opinions.

The Model 3’s competitive price has captured the attention of EV and gas-powered vehicle owners alike, not to mention current Tesla owners. How much it will cost to equip the vehicle with additional features though is still unknown. Curious about consumers’ willingness to pay for add-ons, we asked MDP members that placed deposits on the Model 3 how they plan to configure their new vehicle. In true vehicle enthusiast fashion, none plan to drive off with a base model.

Most members we reached out to are realistic about the upgrades they want. They do not plan to buy a ‘fully loaded’ vehicle, but will weigh the cost against benefits of each individual feature. Typically, these consumers estimate they will spend $45,000 – $50,000 for the final product. Some of the ‘must have’ features are functional, including extended battery range, all-wheel drive (dual motor), and supercharging.  A few expressed an interest in autopilot, but it generally is not a ‘must have’. The possibility of a tax credit will also factor in how much extra they are willing to spend on their vehicle.

For example, here were two direct member quotes:

“I assumed I would spend ~$50k to get what I want. All-wheel drive is mandatory. Longer range is mandatory. All other options will be decided on costs/benefits.”

“I plan to get all-wheel drive, a battery that is close to 85kwHr as they have a supercharger (if there is a fee), and autopilot. Once the prices are known, I’m hopeful that will price the car near $45,000.”

There is a significant gap between when deposits were made for the vehicle and when the Model 3 will be released (many industry experts estimate mid 2018 at the earliest). But how long are people actually willing to wait to buy? Many MDP members claim they are committed to their planned purchase and don’t mind the long wait. Some are trying to manipulate their current lease-end date to coincide with the release of the Model 3. Still others say they will try to extend their current lease or see if the dealership will allow them to continue to lease on a month-to-month basis, or will make due with another vehicle in their household. Additional member quotes highlight this:

“I’m considering this an EV pioneer experience so…as long as it takes.”

“I’ll wait until the end of February 2018 when my Model S lease is up. That seems pretty consistent with the time they are saying deliveries will begin. If   there is a delay beyond that date, I guess I’ll be stuck driving my Spark EV for a while.”

Placing a $1,000 down payment indicates a level of consumer interest and commitment, and our community members are a historically dedicated group, but do they have faith in their fellow enthusiasts? Many believe at least 50% of those who placed a deposit will follow through with an actual purchase. Timing may play a role, they say, as not everyone has control over when they need a new vehicle. Moreover, a person’s ability to purchase may be affected should their financial situation change between deposit date and vehicle availability.

Other MDP members speculate the potential for competitors to release new EV products before the Model 3 is ready, which may sway shoppers hoping to get their hands on a vehicle sooner. As seen from the member comments below, there is doubt as to whether another automaker could introduce a true competitor before the Model 3 is ready, but some admit they would consider other options they see as tempting.

“Perhaps[people will be swayed] if the enhanced CCS [Combined Charging System] network I read about last week actually takes off and becomes competitive with supercharging, and Nissan or GM bring out cars able to take advantage of it, but there’s no sign of that happening.”

“I feel approximately 50% will follow through. Why not a higher percentage? The very long period of time between deposit and delivery. This results in two issues, first, changes in buyers’ personal/financial situation and second, time for competition to take business.”

As seen in two quotes below, MDP members anticipate Model 3 production to begin in December 2017, with a 6-month grace period. Although these consumers have no idea where they are ‘in line’, they suspect their vehicle will be ready sometime between mid and late 2018. While their rank in the waitlist is unclear, Tesla did announce that current Tesla owners will be given priority, and those who reside in California–home of Tesla headquarters –will be among the first to obtain their vehicles.

“I will be pleasantly surprised if I see my car in 2018. 2019 is a safer bet. And for the record, I’d far rather wait for a car that’s done right, than get one soon that needs to be fixed in short order…costing me time and Tesla more money.”

“I am hopeful that deliveries will start in Dec. 2017, but I have allowed for up to 6 months to take delivery of mine specifically. I really have no idea my place in line.”

Many MDP members indicated that they are not familiar with the Tesla delivery process, but do expect to be able to pick up their Model 3 at a local dealer. Some would not mind driving a considerable distance to pick up their EV (up to 90 miles one-way), while others consumers expect it to be delivered directly to their home.

“I am not familiar with the delivery process on a Tesla, but I plan to take delivery in my home state of CA.”

“I hope to go to the factory to pick it up–it is only 90 minutes away. Or get home delivery–like my Model S.”

“I’ll pick it up from the Tesla store in Portland, OR, which is about 80 miles north of me.”

Plans are already in place for their next electric vehicle and based on feedback, most community members plan to do whatever it takes to get their own Model 3. How things evolve as more vehicle details are released and the release gets closer remains to be seen. We’ll be following up to see what MyDrivingPower members think as time goes on.

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26
May

The Electrifying Introduction of the Tesla Model 3

The Electrifying Introduction of the Tesla Model 3By: Andy Moylan, Senior Project Director

It’s no secret that Tesla received more orders for the Model 3 than anticipated on the first day. According to Tesla, the current reservation count is around 373,000 for this premium-brand’s EV that can travel 210 miles on a charge, especially considering the largely attainable base price of $35,000.

Some of our Morpace MyDrivingPower community members placed a $1,000 deposit on a Tesla Model 3, so we wanted to hear more on what these influencers thought of the introduction and the deposit experience.

As unique as the Tesla Model 3 is, so was its introduction…for an automotive product, that is. The unveiling created a high-tech and energetic atmosphere that was more reminiscent of a technology product than that of an automobile. This was more than a car on a stage with the drape pulled off, followed by a series of conventional speeches. MyDrivingPower members referenced similarities to Apple including comparisons between Elon Musk and Steve Jobs in terms of their presentation styles, and they don’t believe any other automotive manufacturer could generate this kind of buzz.

“Clever PR getting the community excited and speculating, feels like Apple in the old days when Steve Jobs would come on stage and do the ‘oh and one more thing’.”

“The introduction process was very Silicon Valley; it was far more fun and genuine than the typical unveilings at auto shows.”

Tesla did something that positively no other automaker could execute with such fanfare. Tesla enjoys a brand halo that no others can seem to match. They have a hardcore fan base that admires their dedication to electric vehicles—there are no internal combustion engines in the line-up, not even as a backup. The large, tablet-like touch screen in the center of the dashboard (complimented by a rumored high-tech Heads Up Display), advanced battery technology, a proliferating supercharging network, and the Autopilot feature speaks more high-tech than any other brand.

“No one else builds or supports cars the way Tesla does (supercharging, styling, performance, updates and ownership experience).”

All of the initial orders  provided Tesla with a substantial cash infusion to continue the development and launch of the Model 3. Some MyDrivingPower members recognize that they are essentially loaning Tesla the funds necessary to bring this vehicle to market.

“I had no problem loaning Tesla a grand for however long it takes to deliver the Model 3.”

“I am eager to support what they’ve created and break free from the traditional automakers.”

Tesla offered online ordering as well as taking in-person orders at Tesla stores. Most of the community members went to their nearest Tesla store (in some cases, a 90 minute drive one way) and stood in line for hours. Despite the long wait, they enjoyed the camaraderie with other EV enthusiasts and felt like they were part of something historical. Placing a deposit at the store also gave some a feeling of confirmation because they delivered it to an actual Tesla employee. Those that ordered online preferred to avoid the lines and placed the deposit from the comfort of their homes.

“I needed an early Model 3 to minimize my time without a car in that gap between my lease expiration and when I take delivery of the Tesla. This is why I waited in line to secure the earliest possible reservation number.”

“As a current owner, I was invited to put my name into a lottery for a ticket to the announcement, but after hearing horror stories about the last one, I decided to pass and watch it at home. I simply went to the website at 7:30 and entered my order without a hitch.”

So why would members be willing to put down a deposit for a car with a design and a feature list that is not yet finalized? Because there is a level of trust, based primarily on the design, performance, and safety associated with previous models—notably, the larger Model S. Members are confident that these traits will carry over to the Model 3.

“The reason I chose Tesla so far is because I know they have a history of producing beautiful cars with a lot of tech packed into them. They also believe in the future of their cars with constant software updates.”

“Based on my co-workers’ experience who have the Model S and my brief exposure to driving that car, coupled with Tesla’s commitment to the success of BEVs, I’m all in.”

So, the deposits are in. But, how long do they plan to wait for their vehicle? Will they take the base vehicle offered, or build up their future car with additional features or options? There is more to come as we continue the conversation with our community.

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21
Mar

Google/Apple Have Little Impact on Consumer Interest in Autonomous Vehicles

apple_google_2

By: Mike Scott, Marketing Director; Sara Beauchaine, Marketing Associate

Would you trust an autonomous vehicle? More importantly, would you purchase an autonomous vehicle today?

Technology giants Google and Apple have strong brands and are among the most recognized companies in the world. Yet even when these brands are attached to questions asked of consumers about autonomous vehicles, our January Omnibus revealed that consumers are not only hesitant about “trusting” autonomous vehicles, but about purchasing them as well.

This shouldn’t come as a surprise. There are various stages of progress that will need to occur long before consumers would be comfortable taking a “cat nap” while their self-driving vehicle transports them from point A to point B. At this point, there is a curiosity that consumers have around the topic but not a clear understanding of what defines “autonomous.”

Officially, Apple hasn’t announced that it is in the autonomous vehicle business, but Google has. Our recent Morpace Omnibus found that a total of 31 percent of consumers “somewhat” trust or “completely” trust an autonomous vehicle with Google technology. Another 31 percent don’t trust the technology, leaving the largest percentage–38 percent–undecided.

In addition, only a minority of consumers are willing to purchase an autonomous vehicle at this time. Price could be a factor, but it’s likely that trust plays a role in the answers we received as well. Overall, 58 percent are “unlikely” or “extremely unlikely” to purchase an autonomous vehicle with Google technology, compared to 59 percent for an autonomous vehicle with Apple technology.

Finally, there was little separation between the price consumers are willing to pay for autonomous vehicles powered by Google versus Apple. Eight-in-ten consumers are not willing to pay more than $40,000, which is the base price for some higher-end standard powertrain SUVs in today’s market. The average price most consumers are willing to pay is less than $28,000, with virtually no difference in the median value for Apple versus Google autonomous vehicles.

As it turns out, we may have found one thing that the powerful brands of Google and Apple can’t directly impact—consumers’ perceptions on autonomous vehicles. Discussions and media reports surrounding autonomous vehicles are becoming more prevalent, and it is clear that education needs to be developed before a majority of consumers feel comfortable enough to drive or purchase a “self-driving” vehicle.

There is a long learning curve ahead for consumers before the autonomous technology “war” among the industry giants, not to mention the automotive OEMs, can begin in earnest.

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2
Mar

New Partnerships, Collaboration, and the Concept of ‘Fail Fast’ Among the Themes at Our Recent Internal Marketing Meeting

Man in suite at a business meeting making notes on a table

By: Sara Beauchaine, Marketing Associate

When the final day of our 2016 internal Marketing Meeting had concluded, our company leaders walked away with several interesting messages you may not often hear from researchers. For example, “failing fast” can be a positive way to encourage innovation, and knowing how to improvise can help in being more supportive of clients and colleagues. But then again, this annual meeting evolved into something much more than qualitative versus quantitative.

The Marketing Meeting is a two-day conference where Morpace managers from all of our global offices meet once a year in Detroit to hear about industry trends from experts, share plans for new products and research solutions, and collaborate on ways to better meet the needs of our clients.

This year we invited Chad J. Willett, a former actor and professional speaker, to present as our keynote. Chad shared how aspects of his acting career can translate into helping “Corporate America” be more innovative, creative, and productive.

Four main concepts were emphasized during his presentation, titled “Smash the Box”: say “yes, and…” to facilitate continued conversation and ideation; embrace mistakes to keep moving forward on the road to success; make statements, as these create better relationships between coworkers and clients; and defer judgement of other ideas.

Go Comedy!, a local improv theater group from metro Detroit, performed during the meeting and shed light on the importance of using improvisational techniques as an effective way to communicate. By bringing some of our team members on stage, they also made us realize the importance of active listening, which can make us all better communicators.

Also on the agenda were presenters sharing more in depth information on recent partnerships which have recently developed with Keller Fay for Word of Mouth research and Qualtrics, a technology provider with particular expertise in CX and Employee engagement. Also discussed was the expansion of our syndicated products, and a “Big Data” product to expand our Commercial Vehicles practice.

Now that this year’s meeting has passed, we can sit back and let the many takeaways of the conference soak in. I was particularly struck by a concept that was presented by our CEO and President, Duncan Lawrence: “Fail Fast”. Duncan encouraged us to embrace the fact that we could fail because the payoff for taking a risk is so much greater. He noted that it is better to fail fast at something, rather than ride out an idea or concept that is bound to fail eventually. After all, failure isn’t avoidable or unacceptable; it is a necessary component of success.

The Marketing Meeting’s overarching theme of exploring new frontiers leaves us with a bright perspective of not only who we are now, but what we will become in the months and years ahead. Perhaps most importantly, we left with a sense of motivation that there is room for us to simply be better, and that we are all an integral part of planning a roadmap to help us get to where we want to be.

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29
Feb

What Would it Take to Use Mobile Banking?

mobile banking image

By: Steven Welling, Project Director

With mobile banking continuing to rise in popularity, the financial services team here at Morpace wanted to look a bit further into mobile banking usage and understand what features consumers would most like to see added.

In our monthly Omnibus, we found that increased mobile banking usage among consumers is associated with higher satisfaction with their primary bank, suggesting that introducing customers to mobile banking and/or providing additional tools within mobile banking may have a positive effect on overall satisfaction.

The Federal Reserve Board’s Division of Consumer and Community Affairs (DCCA) conducts a yearly study about consumer and mobile financial services. (You can find the most current study—released in March 2015— on the Federal Reserve Board’s website here.)

Many of the findings from this survey confirm the understanding we have about mobile phones and banking, including the top reasons why some consumers do not use mobile banking. These include:

  1. Their needs are already met
  2. They don’t see a reason to use it
  3. They are concerned about security

We investigated this further and looked at not only consumer interest in mobile banking, but also their concerns. We considered if all consumer concerns were alleviated, what exactly would create the most interest in using mobile banking? We created an exercise to rank the importance of various enhancements to determine the relative magnitude of the impact when it comes to encouraging mobile banking usage.

We asked consumers: For those who currently use mobile banking, what would increase their usage? For those who do not use mobile banking, what would increase their likelihood of using mobile banking?

We found that not only were some form of incentives the top choice, but the relative magnitude was quite substantial. In fact, those already using mobile banking are over four-times as likely to increase their usage due to some form of an incentive as the second most important, fingerprint authentication.

Financial Services chart

While incentives are still the most important for those who have never used mobile banking, they are not as strong of a motivator for increasing the use of mobile banking. Two-factor authentication (using two separate security verifications to login), fingerprint authentication, and live 24/7 support are also strong influencers when it comes to introducing consumers to mobile banking.

These findings show us that the motivation for mobile banking is not as simple as just introducing them to the app. Individuals have various reasons as to what would make them consider mobile banking or increase their usage. These factors need to be taken into consideration when a financial institution is trying to promote their mobile banking capabilities.

While these findings provide more insight into understanding mobile banking usage, we plan to explore this further by examining how the results would change if incentives were not an option. If a financial institution is unable to offer incentives, how much do the rankings change and how does the relative magnitude of each change as well?

As we continue to monitor and analyze these results we will make sure to keep you up to date on our findings. If you would like to learn more about this research and hear about what our future results tell us, make sure to follow our blog or contact our financial services team here at Morpace.

 

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10
Dec

Hospital Patients Have an Opinion About Patient Surveys

couple reviewing

By: Debra Fin, Vice President; Jennifer Brown, Research Director

Hospital patients who have had a recent inpatient stay have something to share about the patient satisfaction surveys they receive.

Change the methodology please!!!

How do we know?

Morpace conducts a monthly random survey of the American population 18 years and older exploring consumer preferences and trends across all 50 states in our Omnibus Survey. A minimum of 1,000 individuals from our online panel complete a variety of questions and share their demographics with us. From April to September 2015, we collected more than 6,000 responses and got an interesting viewpoint from the population who has had a recent hospital inpatient stay.

Survey Participation is High

12% of 701 people shared that they had been a hospital inpatient in the past six months. A whopping 69% (482 people) of those had been asked to conduct a patient satisfaction survey! More than half, 53%, completed a paper survey they had received through the mail.  This is not surprising since this has been the traditional way to solicit opinions from discharged patients for decades. Our data suggests that online surveying appears to be growing with more than 20% reporting completing a survey via computer, tablet, or mobile phone.

Online Surveys Are Preferred

Hospital patients are very clear in their preferences of how they would like to complete a survey. If given the choice on what method to use to give feedback to a hospital provider, more than 59% of the total sample would choose to complete a survey online with a computer, tablet, or mobile phone. A mail option garnered less than a third of the preference vote. Moreover, 14% would really rather not be surveyed!

HC Survey admin

Those respondents showing higher preference for completing an online survey are white females in higher income brackets with insurance through their employer or spouse. Hispanic and African American respondents indicated a stronger preference for mobile surveys. When we looked at the 65 plus population, they too indicated a preference for online survey completion versus mail (55% vs. 43%).

Back To The Future….

When we looked at combining response choices for administering surveys before discharge, we saw something very interesting.  Almost one quarter of respondents would prefer to complete a survey before discharge! The most popular choice was still a paper survey with a computer or tablet coming in second. It would be interesting to pilot administering patient surveys before discharge using a variety of methods.

Most of us fill out online surveys for other things we consume, why not healthcare services?  The times they are a’changing…

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8
Dec

Mobile Fitness Apps – Adoption Not so Healthy

mobile-fitness

By: Debra Fin, Vice President; Jennifer Brown, Research Director

Given all the advertising, you would think that everyone, and I mean everyone, is using a fitness or health and wellness app to organize or track his or her every step, pill, or healthcare encounter. Not so much.

In fact, much of that advertising seems to be heard by one distinct segment.

How do we know?

Morpace conducts a monthly random survey of the American population 18 years and older exploring consumer preferences and trends across all 50 states in our Omnibus Survey. A minimum of 1,000 individuals from Morpace’s online panel complete a variety of questions and share their demographics with us. From April 2015 to September 2015, we collected more than 6,000 responses to questions about health and wellness apps and got an interesting view of the population who has used a mobile app.

The NOs Have It

A full six out of ten of all respondents have not used an app for health and fitness activities in the last six months. These individuals are likely to be Caucasian males, 55 years or older and have an annual income of $50,000 or less. They are likely to have Medicare or no health insurance coverage.

HC app use 1

Of the total sample, only 18% are using apps to track their exercise/activity level and/or calories burned.  Those tracking weight (13%) and calorie (12.9%) intake come in a close second and third.

When we asked if our respondents would use a mobile app in the future for healthcare related activities, we got a similar picture. Over half (58%) did not see themselves using a mobile app for healthcare related tasks in the future. A significantly higher proportion of these respondents are the same group that has not used one—older white males. This group is known to be highly resistant to health related behavior change.

The Sweet Spot

So who is using these apps?

Females 18-34 years old are those likely to use a mobile app for health care related tasks. A significant proportion of these women has a household income of $100,000 or more and has insurance through their employer or spouse. These individuals are likely already engaged in health and wellness activities and have the financial and lifestyle means to pursue activities supporting fitness, including smartphones, club memberships, fitness gear, and such.

HC app use 2

The Kicker

Improving health…it is about knowing and doing those things that contribute to better health. It is all about behavior change. If mobile apps are to be a part of the solution to better health, then they have to be attractive enough to encourage wide scale adoption.

You can lead a horse to water…but can you get them to use mobile fitness apps?

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3
Nov

What Would You Tell Your Younger Self?

what-would-you-tell-your-younger-self

By Donna Taglione, Vice President

A recent project reminded me that we all learn from our own life experiences. Earlier this year I moderated a series of focus groups with people who had retirement investment products – Roth IRAs, 401Ks, and brokerage accounts. These groups were segmented demographically by age.

Some groups were with people in the early phases of their career trying to balance retirement savings with new house purchases and babies. Others were mid-career, worried about their own savings but mega-concerned about how to save for their children’s college education. Still others were divided into two categories – five years away from retirement and those recently retired.

The most interesting question I asked during these sessions was “what advice would you give your younger self?” Having listened to some heartfelt responses across the groups, and having read posts in the Huffington Post, on the BBC, and even E!Online, all of which asked versions of the same question, I decided to do what market researchers do best and ask a broader group – our staff – the same question.

Generationally, we have all the major demographic segments covered at Morpace: Millennials (1982-2004), Gen X (1965-1981), Boomers (1946-1964), and a few on the youngest end of the Greatest Generation (1930-1946).

What I learned was interesting…

My financial focus group participants overwhelmingly advised “don’t underestimate the power of compounding,” not surprising given the topics we covered. In other words, invest as much as you can beginning with your first job – you won’t miss money you don’t see. It was their version of the Ronco advertisements touting “set it and forget it!”

The overarching theme from my Morpace internal query was gratitude. Regardless of age, Morpace employees advised their younger selves to appreciate what they have in the moment. This appreciation might be for something as simple as free time – the ability to come and go as one pleases before the demands of a job, a partner, and/or children. It certainly includes appreciating family, especially grandparents since they love nothing more than spending time with their family.

Directly linked with gratitude was kindness to one’s self and others. Kindness includes not only being nice, but standing up for those that are picked on. Most everyone can recall a middle school or high school group that left them feeling excluded and, with the wisdom of hindsight, realized maybe the “cool clique” wasn’t so cool after all.

Gratitude and kindness were followed closely by versions of “this too will pass.” There is an old expression – the rearview mirror has 20/20 vision – meaning everything is clearer when you can look back on it, when the drama of the moment is replaced by perspective. Several mentioned learning the benefits of patience – patience to let dramatic situations play out without jumping to conclusions – of learning to pause, reflect, and wait before judging a person you barely know.

Confidence and trusting one’s own instincts are important pieces of younger self advice. We must learn to own our decisions – the good, the bad and the ugly – acknowledge what happened, and move on. Things are not always someone else’s fault.

Interestingly, there is a longing for some youthful chutzpah. Moving away from home – you can always come back. Trying a different career. Taking chances. (I loved this one: “Dye your hair the funkiest color imaginable. If you wait until you’re in your 20’s to do it, it won’t fit with your job. And if you wait until your 80’s, people will think you are senile!”)

Our collective advice to our younger selves was to be less concerned about failing and become more fearless than fearful. We’d all be wise to think like Thomas Edison: “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work!” – or to remember Henry Ford’s advice: “Failure is simply the opportunity [emphasis added] to begin again, this time more intelligently.” Whether financially, as in my focus groups, or in life, fearing less seems to be good advice regardless of age. Our younger selves might have benefited from that advice, but our current selves can too!

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