15
Nov

Shared Decision-Making about Treatment Improves Member Experience

By: Linda Sookman, Behavioral Health Quality and Accreditation Consultant at Morpace

Today’s healthcare environment has given rise to different clinical approaches to care, and how healthcare is delivered. No longer is the patient merely a recipient of medical care – today, they are a vocal partner and participant in the initiatives that will help them lead healthier lives. This has made it critically important that healthcare organizations transform their approach to their members, or risk losing ground to more progressive plans.

Within the last half-generation, we’ve seen this patient-centric philosophy result in the creation of initiatives such as patient-centered medical homes, integrated medical and behavioral health treatment, and the incorporation of community resources. All of these evolutions are the result of a mindset that social determinants critical in ensuring that comprehensive treatment plans are developed with the individual’s needs in mind.

This effort has closed the gap between patient and professional. Between February and March 2018, the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions reported in a survey of adults that an awareness and use of national quality rating tools, and innovations such as wearable tracking devices, have indeed helped to improve the public’s perception about their engagement in treatment.

At the focal point of all of this new activity that supports the necessity of an individual’s engagement in their healthcare treatment, is shared decision-making – a trend I, and my colleagues here at Morpace, have been tracking for some time.

An article published by the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, “How Much Shared Decision Making Occurs in Usual Primary Care of Depression?,” defines shared decision-making as “a collaborative process that allows patients and their providers to make health care decisions together, taking into account the best scientific evidence available, as well as the patient’s values and preferences.”

Researchers found that the impact of shared decision-making between healthcare providers and their patients leads to an improvement in members’ experiences, as well as their overall satisfaction with the treatment received. It was found that individuals who participated and engaged in their treatment gained a higher level of satisfaction than such variables as gender, education level, and/or the total visits they received.

The National Quality Forum (NQF), in conjunction with its National Quality Partners Shared Decision Making Action Team, issued a national call to action to support and incorporate shared decision-making as a standard of clinical practice. The National Quality Partners Team recommended applying the following strategies.

  1. Promote leadership and culture. The success or failure of incorporating shared decision-making into a standard of clinical practice is wholly dependent on the leadership of the organization. Strong leadership impacts the integration of shared decision-making into the culture of the organization.
  2. Enhance patient education and engagement. Practice leaders must take an active role in informing members and their families about the importance of shared decision-making to promote their engagement in treatment. This helps keep the health literacy of patient populations at the forefront.
  3. Provide your healthcare team with knowledge and training. Teams and providers should be coached on the specifics of improving communication with members and their families. This will result in a greater focus on members’ preferences, beliefs, and objectives for treatment. A better understanding of members’ treatment needs, and a discussion of treatment options, can nurture mutual respect and trust.
  4. Take concrete actions. Integrating decision-making tools into healthcare team processes leads to improved efficiency when communicating with members. AHRQ published a variety of clinical decision-making resources at particular points during the members’ treatment. The organization recommends the deployment of clinical decision-making tools based on particular illnesses, specific member populations, preventive health reminders, or notifications that may impact member safety.
  5. Track, monitor, and report. Providers should offer an update on shared decision-making outcomes and member self-reported experiences with organizational leaders, clinical teams, members, and providers.
  6. Establish accountability. Such activity should now become a permanent fixture in the practice’s annual Quality Improvement Program and Work Plan. This should include shared decision-making goals, objectives, and processes, and assignments of team accountability.

The integration of shared decision-making into clinical practice is no longer an option. It is has taken a prominent focus in healthcare policy-making, healthcare quality payment models, healthcare delivery, and with healthcare consumers. I personally believe that adopting such a stance proactively can be measured in much more than the bottom line (though revenue growth, too, is a tidy benefit of being proactive).

My colleagues here at Morpace have the expertise and innovation to assess shared decision-making practices and to recommend strategies that will improve members’ experiences. Morpace can partner with relevant stakeholders to design research projects that assess members’ experience and outcomes, and execute a closed-loop protocol to assure integration of results.

If you would like to discuss this further, or have any questions, please contact me at 248-756-0532 or lsookman@morpace.com.

Linda Sookman, RN, BSN, CPHQ, Lean Six Sigma Green Belt, is the Behavioral Health Quality and Accreditation Consultant at Morpace.

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14
Mar

Insight Communities – Driving ROI, Not Just Research Value


Richard Clarke, Vice President
Global Partnerships, VisionCritical

For decades, research has delivered powerful consumer sentiment and opinion into organizations – enabling these organizations to put the voice of the consumer into their decisions with the goal of creating more meaningful, successful, and effective products and services.

Methods and modes have changed over the years, with more and more complex solutions being created to get closer to the consumer truth at an ever-increasing speed. Incredible insight has been (and will continue to be) gleaned from consumers, informing multiple parts of clients’ business eco-systems. However, for many clients and users, research is seen as a cost center within an organization – something that needs to be done as part of a process or something that must be purchased as part of the broader vision of the business. The value of research is not generally associated as being an integral and fundamental part of overall business planning and development.

This is why whenever there is a downturn in business performance, or regional/global downturns (ex: 2008 Global Financial Crisis), one of the first areas to be questioned and lose budget is research.

What is the “value” that research is delivering?

There are many answers to this question, both objective and subjective, however, too few times does research itself get directly linked back to business performance. Ultimately, asking about the “value” of research is the wrong question. We should be asking: What is the “Return on Investment” of research? Because that is what research is: an investment into the organization, and not a cost.

There are many ways that Return on Investment in research can be measured, including:

  • More informed/accurate business decisions – what is the cost savings from NOT doing the wrong thing or validating the decision (risk aversion)?
  • Faster to market with the RIGHT product – how much does speeding up the development cycle save?
  • Quicker reaction time to customer feedback and demand – what is the short- and long-term savings of rapidly reacting to the situation or of knowing your customers’ buyer journey and pain points?

For years, I have been an advocate of research and Insight Communities – the idea of engaging with individuals to answer the business issues at hand with engaged members who, ultimately, also drive advocacy for the brand. Insight Communities should not be considered a research “cost” but rather as an organizational asset that both informs business decisions and creates brand advocacy among members.

Forrester Consulting recently completed a Total Economic Impact™ Study on the ROI of Insight Communities to clients. In addition to the cost efficiencies and speed value propositions of Insight Communities, Forrester quantified the financial value of continually engaging with members in a community. The highlights include:

  • $1.7M business value from increased customer insight
  • 590% ROI
  • $546K incremental profit and $4.7M increased sales from community members
  • 39% increase in average order value and 70% lower churn rate from community members
  • 75% reduction in cost compared to traditional market research methodologies
  • 4-6x faster speed to results

This continues to reaffirm the belief that an Insight Community is not only an incredibly valuable tool in providing fast and efficient consumer insight, but also drives business action that results in incremental sales and profit for organizations.

These are just some of the reasons that organizations are implementing communities. The client stories about the impact of an ongoing Insight Community are powerful and continue to prove out the short-term and long-term Return on Investment. Shifting the mindset to consumer engagement is resulting in hundreds of organizations realizing significant returns and outcomes (click here for client stories).

Five years ago, communities were more of a niche solution or emerging technology but, according to the latest GreenBook Research Industry Trends Report (Q3 2017), 82% of respondents stated that communities were either in use (60%) or under consideration (22%). This has led GreenBook to no longer believe that they are an emerging solution but are, in fact, a mainstream solution:

“In future editions of GRIT, it is likely that online communities will also be removed from “emerging methods” now that it is mainstream.” (GRIT Q3/Q4 2017).

Ultimately, these two pieces of evidence indicate that an Insight Community is not only a solution that spreads efficient business insight across organizations but is also an asset that drives revenue and profitability – thereby attaching a real-world ROI to the value of the asset.

Feel free to contact me to learn more about how an Insight Community can become your most powerful asset.

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2
Dec

Online Communities: A Powerful Media Relations Tool

By Jason Mantel, Vice President

A strong selling point for Market Research Online Communities is the ability to collect information quickly, sometimes instantaneously, from community members.  The theory goes that having members is exponentially more powerful than having respondents – members are engaged in your brand, eager to share, will be brutally honest in sharing the feedback your brand needs to hear. They are also available to you when you need them. Paper

As a primary market research firm, this is the line we use to promote MROCs.  Too often, though, these amazing tools are not leveraged for an amazing benefit: speed.

Morpace was contacted by Automotive News for thoughts on the electric vehicle market.  We host a MROC in this space, called My Driving Power.  The request came to our team at 4 p.m. on a Monday afternoon, and some of the questions were on topics where we had limited feedback.  Our first inclination was, “we’re missing that data!” And then suddenly, we remembered what we tell our clients – that MROCs generate fast results. (Really, it took time for this to sink in!) One of our analysts posted a few key questions immediately to our members.  And they didn’t let us down.

By 7 a.m. the next morning, we experienced a nearly 30% response rate, and robust results we could share with the publication.  We were able to answer specific questions, with statistically relevant figures, and pages of valuable comments, literally overnight.  I can’t recall another instance in my research career where that was possible, let alone with such a targeted audience.  (And many of our clients who host communities are yet to leverage their members for this type of benefit.)

I can imagine the value of this result in just about any corporate suite.  Even though I knew how it was supposed to work, I was simply amazed when it did.

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