7
Feb

Patient Experience: When Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast


By Debra Fin
Vice President

This provocative statement is attributable to Peter Drucker, widely regarded as the father of modern management thinking. In healthcare, strategy can be devoured by culture’s hunger for maintaining the status quo especially with the relentless pace of change occurring in the industry.

Culture is the way of life for a group of people–the behaviors, beliefs, values, and symbols that they accept, generally without thinking about them, and that are passed along by communication and imitation from one generation to the next. You know culture when you hear hospital employees state, “We don’t do it like that here” or management talks about “our way of thinking”. Culture is the soul and traditions of an organization and, most often, the obstacle to embracing change that focuses on the customer.

C-suite directives to improve customer centricity and focus on improvement of the patient’s experience can authorize CX leaders to gather patient data, hold focus groups and build touchpoint roadmaps. Armed with these insights and tools, operational changes are recommended, communications are built and new services are rolled-out all in an effort to meet the expectations of future patients, improve metrics and increase revenue. Everyone from Administration to Housekeeping waits to hear that patient experience has improved.

Only to find out that the culture on 3West devoured breakfast and is on its’ way through lunch!

Changing the structure, staffing and services of the organization will not suffice to improve patient experience based on patient insights alone. As our most recent Patient Experience case study demonstrates, the culture and values of the organization and its’ employee voices are vital to understanding how to meet the needs and expectations of patients. Equal time must be spent clarifying values, needs, and expectations at both the customer level and at the organization’s human capital level.

Engaging employees is as important as engaging the patient population. Doing both gives you a better eco-system view on how to achieve better service, meet expectations and empower employees to satisfy patients and families. Employees are the engine that delivers on your brand promise by meeting the expectations that define excellent patient experience.

Market research gathering employee insights and reactions to the ideas and expectations of patients can identify the barriers and best practices to delivering on a best in-class patient experience. Employees know how things really work and how to get things done; they can identify where the collaboration chain breaks down in bed scheduling and what families of inpatients really need. Best of all, collectively they have many solutions to improving their patient’s experience and want to be instrumental in creating both better health and better customer loyalty. All you need to do is ask them.

Armed with this 360° view, cultural mores and traditions can be addressed and both the patient and the hospital employee are equal partners in designing the patient experience solution.

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8
Dec

5 Holiday Wishes for the MR Industry

5 Holiday Wishes for the MR IndustryBy Kea Wheeler, Senior Project Director

It’s the time of year for giving and receiving gifts. While I do believe in the old adage that it is better to give than to receive, who doesn’t like to receive a gift? I particularly enjoy the ones that are able to bring greater joy or more convenience into my life. So, this wish list may skip the items I sent to my family for our annual gift exchange, but it does include my wishes for the market research industry this holiday season and into the New Year.


Wish 1: To be regifted past research.

I know some people look down on regifting, but what could be better in the market research industry? Receiving research that has already been conducted and is relevant to a new study being fielded offers the opportunity to understand what was already asked and what insights were already gleaned. This allows for the new study to confirm what was learned previously, but also to go above and beyond those learnings to find something new.

There is nothing worse than conducting a study and hearing the client say “we already knew that.” Therefore, please regift previous research, so new research can focus on discovering and reporting what is in fact an insight, instead of only confirmation of past learnings. That is something both parties can be thankful for.


Wish 2: To be able to mingle with everyone.

Many times in research studies, we only speak with or survey those consumers who have purchased our client’s product or used their service. If we really want to get fancy, we may also include consumers who purchase or use a competitor’s product and service. But are we missing out on not speaking with those outside of a category entirely?

This is particularly relevant for finding out how a brand is perceived in the market place. These consumers can offer a unique perspective on how they view others that buy a particular brand and why they consider them, to be or not to be, a member of the island of misfit toys.  However, understanding how these consumers perceive others associated with this brand will help companies understand the barriers they need to overcome to entice potential new customers.


Wish 3: To immerse oneself in someone else’s reality.

Just like the different variations of Santa Claus, consumers have different realities from what the client may expect. I have been in debrief meetings where a client wants to entirely reject a participant’s comments because what they said was “not true,”  or “used a product in a way other than originally intended,” or “are understanding the message wrong.”  What some clients fail to realize is that the consumer’s feedback is their truth as it is how they perceive the topic at hand.

Instead of questioning their perception, it is better to devote time on how to overcome the consumer’s perceptions and bring them closer to reality that the company intended.  Ask oneself, if the consumer is using a product in a different way than suggested, how can the instructions be clearer? If the message is being taken in the wrong light, what language can be changed to make it more relevant? Asking these questions will provide an avenue to more actionable and relevant tasks for the research team.


Wish 4: To have more time to tell stories.

The must-have item on everyone’s list, in and outside of the market research industry, is story telling. Story telling has been touted as the way to establish a connection between the audience and whatever is being presented. But in market research, we are held to producing a report with details about all of the findings from a particular study.

While some of these findings go into making a story, not all are necessary in telling the story. However, one will quickly be put on the naughty list if they don’t provide an answer to all of the questions asked or all the observations witnessed in a report of some kind.

With this evolution, two deliverables are becoming necessary — the story presentation and a detailed appendix report. One client researcher describes this growing desire in the 2016 Quirks Corporate Research Report:

I wish I would receive two reports – one for me, the client researcher, with all the detail including crosstabs, and one for presenting that REALLY boils down the learning to an easily digestible story that we can take action on.

But the lump of coal in this wish is the fact that reporting time lines are regularly being reduced. Two reports will take more time, energy, and a greater budget to complete. If presentation stories and a detailed appendix report is truly the wave of the future, it must come with the expectation of either increased reporting time lines or increased budget for more people to report simultaneously. Bah humbug.


Wish 5: To get invited to the party.

If the end of many of my projects could be summarized in a sentence, it would be “all dressed up and nowhere to go”. There are plenty of projects where we have fielded the study, created our story, and are asked to hand over the findings with no invite to present to the larger client team. While we strive to create presentations and reports that can stand on their own, having the voice of the one who fielded the research participate in presenting the findings can add so much more richness and depth to the results. But rarely are we asked to the big dance.


Perhaps it is time for market research professionals to throw their own party? What can be done to make our voice indispensable at meetings? Perhaps we need to be better at presenting our findings to our internal contacts. Let them see that our voice – our passion – cannot be duplicated and it’s best to bring us as a date to the big meeting. So, scratch this wish, maybe I’ll wish for stellar hostess abilities instead.

That concludes my holiday wish list for the marketing research industry for 2017 and beyond. Let’s see if I made the nice list and St. Nicolas brings me these gifts. If not, I could always follow up with the Easter Bunny – I hear he can be bribed with chocolate.

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22
Nov

Neuromarketing: Market Research’s Magic Bullet?

neuromarketing: market research's magic bullet?

By Artem Violety, Vice President

Exciting new techniques are emerging within the advertising and technology industries, creating fresh disrupters in market research and opening new doors to more opportunities and insights than ever imagined before. However, as with most new findings, additional research and confirmation is needed before these techniques become relevant and widely accepted.

One new field of study that has emerged is “neuromarketing research”- an attempt to leverage learnings from neuroscience to better understand the brain’s responses to marketing stimuli, and thereby better understand consumer behavior. I had the pleasure of appearing on a panel discussing the topic at the ad:tech conference in New York, held November 2-3, 2016.

The panel discussed how face recognition software could uncover consumers’ emotional states; how biometric markers, such as skin conductance, heartrate, and respiration could be used to detect non-conscious response to stimuli; and how brain imaging techniques, including functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Electroencephalography (EEG) could potentially uncover consumers “true” reactions to marketing stimuli by measuring actual brain activity.

These techniques are obviously very attractive to marketers. Imagine being able to peer into a consumer’s mind and see how interested they are really in a product, or which of two marketing messages better resonates with them, all without having to rely on what they tell us.

Neuromarketing’s focus is on consumers’ “unsaid” thoughts, so in essence, their inner, unedited, potentially unconscious thoughts and feelings. This is generally called “System 1” or “Fast” thinking, and it refers to a consumer’s automatic response to a given stimulus; it’s a potentially vital aspect in decision-making but by no means the only one.

In contrast, more traditional market research focuses on what is explicitly reported by a consumer. This is called “System 2” or “Slow” thinking, and refers to the more deliberate, logical or conscious aspects of decision making.

As one can imagine, both types of responses are worth considering when trying to understand how the consumer feels about a product or service. Unfortunately, the excitement that usually accompanies a discovery of a new set of tools or techniques often overrides not only previously accepted learning but even basic logic.

For example, the notion that there is a metaphorical “buy button” in the brain that can be accessed via neuromarketing is promise boldly made by some practitioners. However, this claim is akin to those made by proponents of using hypnosis or subliminal messages in commercials – highly attractive but without much merit. Since the brain is an organ that evolved over a much longer period of time than humans have engaged in commerce, there wouldn’t have been an opportunity for a “buy button” to be part of the biology of the brain. There are surely “approach or avoid”, “fight or flight” functions built in, but those reflect a need for basic survival, not the desire to buy a shiny new phone or another pair of shoes.

In order to be useful, neuromarketing research must be placed in the proper context – it’s a tool that can be used in conjunction with other traditional techniques, but it’s not a panacea for all marketing questions. As neuroscience evolves and is able to better explain human cognitive abilities, it will surely play a larger role in how we all conduct marketing research. However, it is unlikely it will ever completely replace  the need to actually talk to people in order to understand them, something we humans have a good deal of practice doing.

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1
Jul

Change, Courage, and Possibilities

OpportunityBy: Dania Rich-Spencer, Vice President

As you may know, the Q1-Q2 2016 GRIT report was recently released. I always look forward to learning what’s new and exciting in the market research world, and to gaining a deeper appreciation for our client’s perspective. With the most comprehensive sample to date–2,144 completed interviews and participants from 70 countries–this wave delivers an impressive examination of an industry in the process of reinventing itself.

As I was processing the breadth of information in the report, I glanced at a picture on my office wall. A colleague gave me a beautiful picture with the saying “Change of any sort, requires courage.” I frequently look at this picture for inspiration when dealing with personal and professional challenges, and honestly, some days it’s hard to look away!

There is no doubt the disruptive change the market research industry is experiencing requires courageous adjustments from both Research Buyers and Suppliers. ESOMAR recently presented the “Future of Market Research” webinar where they highlighted the necessity for a team-based approach. The case was made that in order to effectively communicate research findings and influence C-Suite decision makers, a multi-disciplinary approach is required. Weaving together a cohesive story and presenting it in a consultative fashion requires contribution not only from a researcher, but also from a data scientist, a synthesizer, a journalist, and an influential storyteller. This insights team needs to be comprised of creative individuals who are motivated by intellectual curiosity, have a desire to influence, and are comfortable working in a fast-paced, unstructured environment.

I’m confident the industry will successfully manage the human capital transition and adopt a more consultative role to drive positive, sustainable change. However, unless we have a comprehensive understanding of what influences consumers’ decisions and precisely why they choose one product or service over another, the impact of the Voice of Customer will be under-stated.

Online research communities deliver vibrant customer stories riddled with illuminating detail that provide contextual understanding. Unlike brand communities or social media, research communities offer an agile solution for developing a synergistic and mutually respectful relationship between customer and company.

As an example, when defectors in an ad hoc Exit Survey were asked the reason for leaving a health plan, cost was the primary reason year after year. However, when exploring potential defection with members of the client’s research community, when cost was comparable, members’ experience with customer support and their emotional attachment to the company played a much larger role in their decision to change carriers. The ongoing, two-way dialogue inherent in a research community enables the customer relationship to be transformed from survey taker to trusted advisor.

It takes courage to build this type of relationship with customers and it takes courage to put legacy systems behind us. The market research industry has a history of making courageous adjustments to consumers’ changing habits and demands of the marketplace. I have another picture on my wall–“When nothing is certain, everything is possible.”

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19
May

Oh The Places You’ll Go With Virtual Reality!

Oh the places you'll go with virtual reality!By: Cory Kinne, Research Analyst

You don’t have to be a tech nerd to know that Virtual Reality is cool. It just is. There’s a reason it is always cropping up in fiction—from early sightings in Ray Bradbury’s Illustrated Man, to the smash-hit Matrix trilogy and beyond. The idea of transporting ourselves into a simulated world is intoxicating.

Excitement over Virtual Reality (VR) reaches a fever pitch in the realm of video games. Allowing players to visualize themselves in the worlds they are exploring opens new doors for immersive storytelling. Possibly no other industry is positioned to gain as much from advancements in VR technology as the gaming industry, but that’s not to say it doesn’t have utility elsewhere.

After spending an evening playing with my new Google Cardboard headset, I stumbled upon a question: How might VR be useful in Market Research?

Thousands of dollars are spent on product evaluation clinics, especially in the automotive industry; finding an appropriate sized venue and arranging the delivery of vehicles carries a hefty price tag. What if a clinic could be conducted for the cost of shipping a box of VR headsets and the booking of a hotel conference room?

Obviously, examining a 360 degree rendering of a vehicle will never replace the richness of the traditional, more tactile in-person experience. But is there value to be gained from the agility and simplicity of VR? For example, could insights be uncovered earlier in the design process? Could VR technology minimize the likelihood of unforeseen flaws making their way to the finished product?

Of course, we shouldn’t limit our thinking to the automotive industry—there are other areas where this technology could be useful. It is possible VR will open doors to new areas of Market Research, areas that are currently unexplored or, at the very least, underrepresented.

Imagine working with a hotel chain during the construction of a new property—using a VR headset, respondents may be able to explore a digital mockup of proposed room layouts and designs. With the exception of bed comfort, nearly everything could be evaluated! Feedback on room size, color schemes, furniture design, space utilization and even the artwork on the wall could help ensure the satisfaction of future guests.

The history of VR is filled with bumps and bruises, but with an unprecedented number of products entering the market it appears that virtual reality is here to stay. Though the technology is clearly in its infancy, it may be prudent to speculate about its future utility—further progress in availability, usability, and realism has the potential to revolutionize how we conduct our research.

Who knows the places we’ll be able to go…

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4
May

8 Ways to Think like a Market Research Anthropologist

 

8 Ways to Think like a Market Research AnthropologistBy: Erica Ruyle, Lead Anthropologist and Vice President, Qualitative Solutions

Much to my wife’s annoyance, my brain never shuts off. We will go to a movie and I will practically be bouncing in my seat as my brain works through all the cultural messages and implications of the experience.  (So we are all on the same page, I define culture as “the patterns of behavior, thought and feeling that are learned, shared and transmitted across generations.”)  Following the movie and dinner I inevitably babble on about the theories, connections and other positing on the film.  After all in the world of an anthropologist, everything has meaning, a hidden “other” so to speak.

On a recent trip to Las Vegas, my favorite few hours of the entire trip comprised of me sitting in the hotel’s casino, sipping dark, bitter coffee and watching people. Were they there on business or pleasure?  Where did they come from?  What was their link and connection to the people around them; what relationship did they have with those they were drinking, eating, and talking with?  I would draw up entire kinship maps and sketch stories of their life and then give meaning to it.  I would watch their interactions and movement throughout the hotel and casino floor, while my brain worked the patterns and behavior around me. As the old idiom goes, “this is both a gift and a curse.”

As you can see, being an anthropologist means having boundless curiosity. My mind is constantly shuffling information around regardless of which of the five senses it comes from.  Far too often we tend to focus on the words and miss other subtle cues around us such as body language or not so subtle cues that can easily be overlooked such as the material culture around us. As an anthropologist this works to my advantage as we are trying to find patterns of meaning in structures and systems.  Culture is an endless layered facet of the human condition and looking beyond we begin to understand the behavioral and symbolic meaning that drives people is what we do.

With years of training I have learned how to hone my skills to not only see what is around me but also how to talk in a meaningful way about what I have learned. My favorite aspect of ethnography is bringing to life what I experienced.  I’ve done my job when a reader can feel as if they were actually there during the research; they can feel what the research respondent felt and take a peek through the lenses of their eyes.  Of course, this does not always transfer well to market research deliverables but it is all part of the process.  My job is to bring the consumer and their world to life in an actionable way that makes sense.

Even if you are not an anthropologist or do not have anthropological training, you can still think like one. Anthropologists study people and their culture. Everything in market research is based on the thoughts, feelings, and actions of groups of people.

There are eight ways that you can think like an anthropologist for any research project, even if it is not ethnographic /anthropological in nature. Follow these and you are well on your way to thinking like an anthropologist!

  1. Stay on the move
  2. Keep your eyes open
  3. Always be curious
  4. Challenge your assumptions
  5. Ask a lot of questions (to your respondent and yourself)
  6. Dig deeper
  7. Engage multiple point of view
  8. Don’t believe everything people say

In a coming blog, I will delve more deeply into the slippery notion of culture. It is essential to grasp, even if not explicitly used in market research. I will outline what the benefits are to having this knowledge and how it can help you get more insightful, meaningful analytical results, further supporting your research efforts.

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11
Apr

Commercial Vehicles: New Platform = New Insights

Commercial Vehicles: New Platform=New Insights

By: Michael Schmall, Vice President; Sara Beauchaine, Marketing Associate

What if you had access to information about commercial vehicles including classes, makes, models, and engines from multiple industry sources?

Think about what you’d discover with this detailed information! New doors would open. You’d have the capability of anticipating what future commercial vehicle products should include and how they should be re-engineered. Critical customer needs and satisfaction issues could be resolved. Brand concepts could be strengthened. Smarter companies could be developed.

Sounds impossible, right? The commercial vehicle sector is too disconnected.

Think again.

The newest platform in our toolbox of syndicated and proprietary products is CVIS, and it stands for “Commercial Vehicle Information System”. It’s a great solution that we’ve developed over the course of the last year, and it offers the answer to the commercial vehicle industry’s frequently encountered challenge of obscurity and disconnect. It eliminates the mystery between those developing the next generation of  commercial vehicles, and those who actually use them.

How does it work?

The Commercial Vehicle Information System (CVIS) platform is a series of syndicated products built on millions of telematics data points (including information from VINs!) from hundreds of thousands of trucks on the road. It utilizes complex information consolidation techniques from surveys and other databases to provide this information to interested parties.

This platform has the ability to see how commercial vehicles are being driven, where they are being driven, which ones are actually being used, and even operation time. In addition, Morpace has developed processes to gain insights into commercial vehicle body type information, which is also part of the CVIS platform. The amount of knowledge and insights it provides is really exciting!

From conception to actualization

How CVIS started is a long story and it has a very dynamic background, but let me make it quick. It all started last year when a colleague and I attended the Mid-America Trucking Show of 2015. We were struck by the mass amounts of information that the exhibiting companies generated through their telematics systems, and we thought: They must have A LOT of data. What can we do with it?

After months of tracking down contacts, seeing what we could build with the millions upon millions of data pieces, investigating how it could be supplemented with other information, and exploring what products could be derived from all this, we came up with CVIS. Let’s just say it’s been a long road!

Incredible new insights are unleashed

We already have customers asking for proposals, and we’re excited to share this truck-load of information with them. They’re going to benefit from robust, quantitative analysis possibilities and data that is measured in terabytes (but useable because of our sophisticated data delivery systems), along with an incredible competitive advantage. They’ll be able to access current results and usage patterns of vehicles on the road, which enables them to display forward-thinking expertise, from product design to development strategies. We can also give comprehensive reports and additional analysis on all this data. In fact, the newest related product lines are our Efficiency Metrics Reports, which focus on important topics such as idle time, braking performance, downtime evaluation, fuel efficiency and QRD (quality, reliability, and durability) analysis.

To sum it up: If you understand how people are using commercial vehicles—which now you can with CVIS—then you can enjoy a win/win situation. You’ll be smarter—and a smarter company provides what its customers need—which in turn creates happy customers.

Check out our website for more information and to download the factsheet.

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4
Apr

Consumers’ Positive Reaction to the New Tesla Model 3

 

Consumers' Positive Reaction to the New Tesla Model 3By: Jason Mantel, Senior Vice President

On Thursday March 31st, the world was introduced to the carefully planned unveiling of the new Tesla Model 3 at the Design Studio in Hawthorne, Calif. And it’s fair to say that the world was ready for the news. After all, more than 180,000 vehicles were ordered on the first day, according to the Wall Street Journal.

There’s a lot riding on the Tesla Model 3 both for Tesla itself, as this Slate article opines, and for the electric car market in general. At Morpace we quickly gathered insights and perceptions from our MyDrivingPower online community, a group of more than 300 U.S. based consumers that are current or recent owners of EVs or hybrids, and via our social media platform.

So what first impression did the smallest Tesla make on consumers? Overall, the first impressions of the Tesla Model 3 are generally positive. Morpace measured a net positive sentiment of 70 percent across the social media spectrum. But the good vibes go beyond just appearance or features. MyDrivingPower panelists were impressed with the affordability of the Tesla Model 3, which has a base price starting at $35,000. Beyond just the price point itself, there is a feeling of ‘value’ in the Model 3 offering. Specific quotes from our panelists included:

               “The Model 3 has made my goal of owning a Tesla possible.”

               “It is so much more at an affordable price point than any of the other electric cars.”

We see that consumers may have reached beyond customary automotive media outlets for learning about the Model 3. Instead, sites and blogs that provide technology news are bustling with traffic. We talked to members of our MyDrivingPower community of electric vehicle owners, who are looking to sources like Wired and TechCrunch for their Model 3 updates. These enthusiasts are visiting technology sites (49%) slightly more than automotive sites (44%) to learn more about this Tesla model. Tesla’s own website appears to be a similarly visited site. The introduction of an electric vehicle seems to transcend traditional classification, arguably being as much a ‘technological advancement’ as an ‘automotive advancement’.

As of today, Tesla is generating all the buzz with the anticipation of their Model 3. The number of Model 3 units pre-ordered is likely to rise in the coming months as more information becomes available and familiarity increases. But for today, when thinking about this vehicle and similar models from other manufacturers, our community of electric vehicle owners are leaning towards the Model 3, as compared to the Chevrolet Bolt.

Nearly 9in 10 members selected the Tesla Model 3 over the Chevrolet Bolt, perhaps the most closely similar model available (based on range and price) if they were in the market for a vehicle today. Specific quotes about the Tesla Model 3 included:

               “An industry changer.”

               “It makes all other cars seem old and out-of-date.”

Morpace will be closely following the journey of customers anticipating the Tesla Model 3 over the coming months.

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5
Feb

The ‘Off Recipe’ Advantage

pasta-pot-photo

By: Donna Taglione, Vice President

I love to cook but I hate to bake.

I can break out in a cold sweat at the thought of baking a batch of cookies, but my BFF Chili with its 25+ ingredients is one of my “go-to” winter meals. Seems weird, right?

Cooking and baking both need bowls and tools, pots and pans. Both have recipes. But cooking allows for personal expression–a little more of this and a little less of that is OK. Most of the time it is more art and less science. Take the garlic out of chili because it gives you indigestion and no one is any the wiser unless you tell them – it’s still chili.

Adding some heat to “kick it up a notch” (thank you Emeril) takes a knowledge of ingredients and makes the experience of cooking and eating more individualized.

Baking, on the other hand, isn’t just science – it’s chemistry. Alter the ingredients or recipe by even a little and all your hard work could end up in the garbage can when the cookie drops come out of the oven like flat, over-done pancakes (trust me on that one).

As I was cooking dinner on Sunday, I was thinking about this blog post and decided maybe that’s why I’m drawn to qualitative research. While I rarely cook with a recipe, I would never bake without one. The flexibility and creativity I find in meal preparation is much like the flexibility I find when conducting qualitative market research.

Just as I like adding a little more of this and a little less of that in my meals, during an in-home I can go “off recipe” and let the consumer guide the discussion. Of course, I am well aware of all the ingredients needed to get to the end result. But does it matter how we get there? Will a little more of this and a little less of that hurt the outcome? For the most part it doesn’t, as long as you don’t forget any of the key steps.

With qualitative, just like in cooking, it’s often the occasions you go “off recipe” that make the difference between the same old thing, and something that turns a “standard” into the dish that everyone really enjoys.

So next time a qualitative project comes up and you want to stick with the same ingredients and follow the tried and true recipe, try to find a way to add your unique flavor to the method or topic.

You never know, you just may like it!

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14
Oct

Revealing Modern Truths About Fantasy Football

Fantasy-Football

By Greg Deinzer, Research Director

(With input from Chris Winkler)

I love watching football, but haven’t been involved in a fantasy league for 25 years. Back then, there was no online assistance to research or draft players, or to keep track of everyone’s weekly stats.

After all, that was the job of your league’s ‘commissioner’ who conscientiously entered data into a Lotus 1-2-3 spreadsheet and then kept all the important information to himself. That’s why he always won the $100 money pool year after year.

Nowadays, it seems everyone and their mother is in a fantasy football league. So, being the good market researcher that I am, I was curious to find out more about why fantasy football is still so popular. Findings from Morpace’s September 2015 Omnibus survey of 1,001 U.S. respondents help reveal some interesting truths about fantasy football leagues.

It turns out that only 13% of all respondents are involved in one or more season-long NFL Fantasy Football leagues this year. Of those currently participating, one-half are playing in one league, over one-fourth in two leagues, and 1-in-5 is in three or more leagues.

One-in-seven people who are currently in a league are participating for the first time. (Welcome…to the jungle!) And, about one-fourth have been involved for seven or more years. (Watch it bring you to your knnn knne knees, knees.) (Guns N’ Roses ca. 1987).

More women are joining season-long fantasy football leagues than when I participated. According to our Omnibus, over one-third (36%) of those currently playing in a league are female, and one-half of them are in their first or second year.

Surprising to me is that the top reason for joining a fantasy football league isn’t to win the prize pool. Three-out-of-five play because they like the competition and one-fifth want to do something together with their spouse/partner (which defeats the whole purpose in my opinion. Maybe that’s why I’m divorced).

There are fewer musty basements to meet in anymore. All of the fantasy football leagues are now hosted online, and well more than one-half of the participants draft their team online from various locations. Bars and restaurants even advertise each summer the reasons why your fantasy football draft should be held at their establishment.

Fantasy football leagues are also not as costly as I remember. The median total spent, according to our Omnibus, is $50 including entry fees, reference books, magazines, advice, parties, etc. However, close to one-third of fantasy managers subscribe to DirecTV’s NFL ticket, and if you’re like me and also subscribe, you know that this package can sometimes require a second mortgage. That may be why the mean total spent is $196 and $347 for first and second year participants.

In total, players admit to spending an average of 5.5 hours per week managing their team(s). Combine this with the two-thirds of fantasy managers who watch 3 or more games per week (at least one-half’s worth of the game) and we have a lot of time spent (or wasted) per week.

Three-fourths of those employed admit to checking on their fantasy football team at work, averaging 3.5 hours per week ‘managing’ their teams. I think we can double that average and add a few more hours and still not be close to reality.

Like me, 7% are not currently in any fantasy leagues, but have been in the past. Unlike me, about one-half of those people ‘Have other things to do’. Five percent even admitted that they quit because it interfered with their job. Hey, whatever happened to multi-tasking?

With the barrage of commercials for “one week” fantasy games and the amount of money you can win, the 5% of all respondents and one-third of current season-long participants who report playing the weekly contests seems low. But, because of illegal use of insider information, weekly games are probably only fun and profitable for the people who work at the websites who host them.

Oh, and if you are wondering who is going to win Super Bowl 50, 12% of all respondents predict the New England Patriots will repeat as champs. Seven percent pick the Green Bay Packers. Another 7% feel that the Seahawks will come through, barring a last second interception. And a whopping 47% chose a team that I’ve never heard of – ‘Don’t know/Don’t care’.

This likely isn’t information that you will use to help your company become more profitable, but the data from this Morpace Omnibus may help you to sound smarter than your fellow fantasy football league owner. And if anything, it tells us that America’s love for football is not going anywhere (that is, if you disregard the one-half who ‘Don’t know/Don’t care’).

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