4
Apr

Why the EV Work Truck is Here to Stay

By: Michael Schmall, Vice President, Automotive

For more than two decades, the National Work Truck Show has been where commercial trucking business gets done. Invariably, deals made on the floor of this expo result in the placement of thousands of new big rigs on America’s roadways.

Tough. Dependable. Job done.

At this year’s show, however, I noticed a perceptible shift in the winds, heralding a greener future. Discussed for years, but considered the costly stuff of fancy imagination and drawing boards, EV trucking has made its grand entry into the trucking consciousness, and a new trio of current-time buzzwords were being uttered by attendees of this year’s show:

Autonomy. Connectivity. Electrification.

Indeed, the biggest headlines at the NTEA’s annual showcase weren’t about torque, hauling capacity, and power. In fact, the news that had everyone buzzing was the opinions of some experts that, by 2022, the cost of owning an EV truck, over its lifetime, will equal that of its gas or diesel-sipping counterparts.

Let that sink in for a moment. It cannot be understated that, in a room full of people who depend upon box trucks to tractor-trailers for their livelihoods, no less than some of the industry’s biggest advocates pronounced that their entire business model is about to be forever transformed.

“Electrification can be really beneficial for the work truck environment,” said Michael Berube, a U.S. Department of Energy executive and presenter at the show. “I know we’re in the early days, but the time is now for people to get in and start experimenting, because it’s going to be the wave of the future.”

Presenters like Berube aren’t just thinking about catching the latest wave in technology – they are also considering the positive environmental impact of the work truck industry shifting to EV powertrains as millions of hybrid and EV passenger cars emit infinitesimal amounts of carbons into our atmosphere. In fact, the National Energy Agency found that emissions for heavy-duty vehicles (HDV) have grown faster than any other transit mode – by a national average of 2.4 percent – since 2000.

 

What will it take for work trucks to dive into the EV pool?

Clearly, despite the headline-making benefits of EV, the market reality is thus: Few manufacturers are poised to deliver fleets of electrified rigs. It will take more than the Tesla Semi – a fully electrified tractor-trailer scheduled to hit highways in 2020 – to turn a whimper into a bang.

Fortunately, more traditional rivals have taken notice. Daimler, the world’s largest truck manufacturer, is already producing electric rigs under its various brands. Last June, they unveiled two electric Freightliner trucks – the eCascadia and medium-duty eM2 106 – which they confirm are poised for production in 2021. More recently, in late March of 2019, Tesla rival Nikola Motors announced it was building a manufacturing facility for its hydrogen-electric rig on 400 acres of land it purchased in Arizona. Finally, Ford signaled their EV intentions, announcing the evolution of their eTrucking plans at the Work Truck Show.

However, with these few exceptions, the work truck industry remains woefully unprepared for this phase shift. Most companies simply aren’t ready to take advantage of this change, or haven’t felt the pressure of increased demand from purchasers, to double-down on EV technology.

 

Why should the work truck industry embrace EV?

Clearly, if we analyze the cost-to-operate statements made at the Work Truck Show, we can extrapolate that in about a half-decade, EV trucks will be cheaper to operate over their lifetime than fueled rigs. Understanding and marketing these benefits will likely help to move the needle.

Government entities, eager to reduce emissions, will likely insist that fleets start to make the transformation over time – so the burden may shift to fleet managers, who will look to embrace EV additions to their fleets sooner, rather than later.

The European Union and Chinese truck makers are forging ahead into electrification, understanding its environmental and economic importance. So it will be imperative for American manufacturers to keep pace and push the EV needle to remain competitive.

The time is now to gain a greater understanding of the EV trucking business – definitely, clearly the risk for those who delay entry is great.

Want to gain a greater understanding of how electrification trends will impact your manufacturing operations? We at Morpace are happy to help you gather insights to help you better embrace an EV trucking future. Contact me – Michael Schmall – to start the conversation now.

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28
Mar

Have Plug, Will Travel – The Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) Revolution Has Arrived

By: Artem Violety, Vice President, Automotive

The “Automotive Revolution” has arrived – not with a bang, but with silence. Battery Electric Vehicles (BEVs) – with their emission-free, high-torque benefits – have already become ubiquitous on the streets of the world’s largest cities.

Injected into the consciousness by Tesla, which made BEVs cool and sporty while boosting their range between charging cycles, BEVs are finding their way into the hands of a growing number of consumers. In 2018, more than 2.1 million new car buyers around the world chose battery power – motivated by energy-consciousness, the cool factor, or simply being the early adopter for new technologies.

At the same time, it’s still unclear who will be the target buyer for the new generation of BEVs. Though actor Tom Hanks once famously and proudly proclaimed that he drives a BEV “to save America,” such altruism is not universal, especially when it comes at a premium.

Also, manufacturers are still rolling out BEVs that are “less than” – forcing compromises that some members of the car-buying public may feel are simply not worth it. Suffice it to say, finding the balance between actual driving needs and current BEV capabilities will be key to widespread adoption of BEVs.

Among the questions that must be answered satisfactorily for the public to broadly accept BEVs into their lives:

 

What do I have to do differently to drive a BEV?

Tesla aside, many of the current generation of BEVs have required compromises that aren’t always palatable to a public that is well served with current products. BEVs tend to have unusual, polarizing styling cues, and are small in stature, compromising passenger and cargo space for the sake of efficiency. Additionally, fully committing to a BEV means that drivers will have to refine their pedal-stomping, race-from-red driving habits to optimize the range on a charge.

Manufacturers seem to be heeding the public’s desire for BEVs that blend in. Hyundai’s Kona crossover SUV and the remodeled Nissan Leaf have been styled in the ilk of more traditional offerings – and have been met with accolades as a result.

 

Where do I plug in?

Today, there are more than 67,000 charging stations across the United States, with more opening daily. But there are 168,000 gas stations, which means drivers will likely have to cover significant ground to find a place to “charge up.” Though consumers will get the best charge via a dedicated, proprietary charging connection, many of today’s BEVs can be charged in a pinch (albeit slowly) through typical household current.

Of course, you can install a fast charger in your own garage; the national average cost for installation is around $1,200. For many, charging at home is one of the greatest benefits of having a BEV.

 

How far can I drive on a full charge?

Though this has improved significantly, there’s still a way to go. GM’s first fully electrified vehicles, which hit roadways in the early 1990s, needed a charge every 70 to 80 miles – barely enough for the daily in-town grind, and certainly too stingy for road warriors. Today’s mass market BEVs can cover about 200 miles between plug-ins, and some newer products are even promising 400 miles.

 

I can fill my gas tank in three minutes – why can’t I charge as fast?

Charging technologies, though improved, still haven’t leveled the playing field with fossil-fueled counterparts. The typical home charger can only muster a full charge every 6-8 hours; and fast chargers in the wild can cut that to just a couple of hours (Tesla’s Supercharger technology cuts the full-charging time to just 30 minutes). New battery-charging technologies are being tested that will reduce the charging time to 15 minutes, but it’s important to note that both battery and charging infrastructure will have to be modified to deliver the benefits.

 

Will prices come down?

This is a function of several factors – improved battery technology as well as government rebates and tax credits certainly will help, but consumer adoption will have the biggest downward pressure on price. It’s truly a chicken-and-egg paradigm – volume will ultimately drive discounts. Consider that the major manufacturers are spinning out millions of gas-powered cars each year – if BEV sales comprise only a small percentage of that total, you have to pass along more of the manufacturing and research charges to the consumer.

That said, more than half of US BEV sales in 2018 were racked up by one car model – the Tesla Model 3. This car managed to double the market while only being out for half the year. What drove its sales success was its increased range – up to 300 miles on a charge – for a price, around $40,000, that was in the ballpark for most luxury sedan consumers.

Are you looking to better understand the wants and needs of the potential BEV-buying public? We are continuing to do innovation research in electrification consumer wants, and always happy to help. Reach out to me, Artem Violety, and I will be happy to discuss any questions you may have and how Market Strategies InternationalMorpace can help you reach your stakeholders.

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7
Feb

Rise of the Smart Car: The Shape-Shifting Motoring Future is Already Here

By: Duncan Lawrence and Stephan Schroeder, Automotive Research Professionals

 

For fans of the Terminator series of movies, it was compelling to think about a world that would foster “The Rise of the Machines.”

For consumers today – living in a switched-on world where the once-impossible is now a foregone conclusion – a profound, shape-shifting change is underway – one that we will call, “The Rise of the Smart Car.”

For those who have experienced the “tip of the iceberg” innovations in today’s currently-available models, it’s easy to see how the continued evolution of automated features, connectedness and yet-to-be-scoped technology will portend a future that is not that far off.

As we walked the floor of the recent Consumer Electronics Show, we gasped at the surreal experience before us. No longer did we see cars, as we, for generations, have come to experience them. Replacing the four wheels and a box were a dizzying array of form factors – designed more to contain, and define, a future driving experience where the exterior is not nearly as relevant as what lives inside. Changeable seats, in-car virtual reality, and holographic systems are among the newest innovations, jockeying to advance the traveling transformation underway.

Another reality that quickly unfolded as we walked the CES: There’s not one universal standard for the smart cars of the future. And, likewise, there’s no universal agreement on what the future “device” should look like. Beyond agreeing that electrification, connectivity, shared mobility and autonomy are the foundation, there’s no unifying approach that would dictate things like how many screens are enough (or too much), what the interior should look like, or how pervasive these connected car systems should be during the driving experience.

This makes it even more imperative that manufacturers, designers and others who earn their salt from the automotive industry, gain a keen understanding of where the motoring future is headed – and to embrace an ideal in which the car will be at the center of how we travel or experience seamless mobility.

 

“The Car, As We Know It, Is Dead.”

This change from what we have accepted as a “car,” is a movie that we’ve seen before (and, by this, we do not mean a Hollywood production). For the longest time, the phone was a clearly defined object – a box with 12 buttons, a handset and a cord. For generations, there was little debate as to what the phone should look like. Then, at some point, the cord was cut – and the world went crazy. No longer could we envision what the future of the phone would look like. Experimenters tried approaches that eliminated some – or all – of the telephone’s sacred cows – buttons, dials, handsets and cords.

Today, the device we hold – the smartphone – is the result of a tumultuous sea of change in the phone segment. And the “phone” itself – the enablement of point-to-point voice communication – is relegated to a single button on a screen with endless communication choices.

So can we expect that, in similar fashion, the core function of the car – to deliver people and parcels from Point A to Point B – will simply be an item on a long list of what the “smartcar” of the future can do?

Let’s explore in more detail by looking at some themes that were emerging as we absorbed the CES.

 

Mega Trends Are Alive and Well

  • Personalization – Though we can program our favorite waypoints and radio stations in today’s vehicles, consumers – accustomed to downloading whatever apps they desire to their smartphones – will be demanding much greater personalization in the vehicle of the future. Customization of physical and sensory aspects (such as interior lighting and sound), connected services (both remote and in-vehicle), and virtual personal assistants that connect us to the car and to other devices, lead the list.
  • Experience – Acquiring possessions is losing ground to the appreciation of an experience. In vehicles, this is manifesting itself by making driving less of the focus, while offering new functions with benefits, such as enhanced comfort, entertainment and productivity – many of which will be available “on demand” to the consumer, through subscription services.
  • Sharing – Consumers share more than ever before, both actively (e.g., Facebook) and passively (e.g., location-based apps). Vehicles are joining the fray as sharing becomes not only a common trend, but also a way of accelerating future product developments (i.e. open platforms).

 

The Automobile Reinvention is Under Way

In order to lead this reinvention, manufacturers, suppliers and technology companies are focusing on four specific areas:

  • Electrification – Fossil fuels are giving way to cleaner, more sustainable electricity in vehicles at an accelerating pace. In the bold future, fuel economy and range become secondary considerations outweighed by the benefits of electrification (remember, we didn’t stop using carriages because we ran out of horses). Vehicles will become electrified vessels, which are propelled, connected and personalized with circuitry and current rather than gasoline. It’s not just vehicles that are becoming electrified – from scooters and bikes to buses and semi-trucks, all are offering increasing flexibility, with limited compromise. Moreover, infrastructure improvements – not just added charging points, but apps helping consumers leverage the cheapest and fastest sources of charging – will smooth the wrinkles of some of the current barriers. New charging solutions may emerge, and battery capacity will undoubtedly continue to expand.
  • Connectedness – Today, we pair our phone with the car and we consider ourselves “connected.” But the future of connected services includes a variety of variables – human to vehicle, vehicle to vehicle, vehicle to infrastructure, and beyond – that represent a key stepping stone to full autonomy. To that end, the coming of 5G is a game-changer that will bring with it new levels of cellular reliability and speed which can rival our current home/office experience. One of the interesting questions is how we will communicate this new mobility experience. How do we help consumers make the transition from experiencing the physical features of car (“butts in seats”) to the digital experience (“thumbs on buttons”)?
  • Shared Mobility – As the relationship with our car transforms into this symbiotic and connected experience, the ideal of vehicle “ownership” or household fleet will change as well. Technologies which will increase utilization efficiency exponentially will also foster greater interest in shared mobility as consumers may find saving money or reducing carbon footprint more important than individual autonomy. One can envision that more of our transportation needs will no longer be tied to a particular vehicle, but will be portable to the most convenient form of transit on a given day. Integration with other forms of shared mobility – including aviation and rail, or individual mobility, such as scooters – will provide access to everyone, regardless of age, health, income or legal constraints. This likely represents the final step that will facilitate full autonomy.
  • Autonomous Driving One could expect that, at first, we will see the rise of “dedicated” autonomous lanes or zones to provide the clearest path for driverless vehicles. But, along with the physical advances of features and infrastructure must come a way to reassure consumers of their ability to trust the features and functions of an autonomous vehicle. Safety, security and privacy considerations – hallmarks of today’s insecure computing infrastructure – become even more integral when lives are at stake.

So with all that said, it was exciting to witness the beginning of a new era. The opportunities at the intersection of the trends and areas of reinvention are plentiful. Technology will help us to overcome some of the limitations of the manufacturing-based business model, and solutions will come through competition between both established and new players, as the race for the future of mobility has begun.

Are you ready for the rise of the “smartcar?”

Contact Duncan Lawrence and Stephan Schroeder to learn more.

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24
Jan

Disconnected: Why OEM Apps Aren’t Riding Shotgun on the Connected Vehicle Journey

By: Automotive professionals Corey Reiter & Stephan Schroeder

Connected vehicle technology is rapidly becoming ubiquitous, both here in the United States and across the globe. This year, according to Statista, it is expected that more than 64 million cars worldwide will be shipped with some form of connected tech.

For those proclaiming the arrival of a bold future – one in which cars will pilot their way down the road with little to no input from a human driver – connected services are seen as a major building block of this transformation, and manufacturers clearly are eager to put upgraded tech into the hands of consumers. Ultimately, many OEMs would love it if consumers viewed them as much as mobility providers as manufacturers of transportation products.

As OEMs gain greater ownership stakes in innovative mobility entities, connected services are also seen as a new, recurring revenue stream of the future for the automotive industry. Manufacturers are counting on these services as future drivers of engagement and consumer loyalty, helping to offset declining revenue in other areas.

However, in a proprietary survey* we recently conducted, it appears that consumers are still struggling to develop a connected relationship with their daily rides. We found that 84 percent of 1,000 drivers surveyed aren’t using mobile apps that OEMs have developed to control aspects of the ownership and driving experience.

It’s a startling statistic, given that mobile application use is a very common consumer practice across most service sectors, from buying tickets online and monitoring news feeds to business practices such as remote industrial control and fleet management. So why the reluctance to adopt connected car applications? And how do OEMs close this gap? Let’s take a closer look.

 

Marketing OEM Apps and Connected Services

We learned from our sample group that a majority – 56 percent – weren’t even aware of the existence of an OEM app. This stifling lack of awareness would seem to be an easy hurdle to cure – far easier, it would seem, than convincing the next largest group – 27 percent – who were aware of the existence of the OEM app but weren’t impressed enough to use it.

As we delved deeper, we learned that marketing of OEM apps was limited – mostly left to salespeople who may not have the technical background to spotlight key features; or to a link on a website with little fanfare.

Clearly, more proactive marketing of the apps will help, but it also will be valuable to position these apps as a critical ingredient in “personalizing” the driver experience. Salespeople at the dealership have an opportunity now to use these apps to build trusted relationships with buyers by focusing on features of connected services particular to that individual. If the sales mantra in the past was to get “butts in the seats,” the future will be about getting “thumbs on the buttons.” Focusing on the connected services that heighten the level of interaction between the consumer and the vehicle, and getting consumers to experience the digital relationship with the vehicle can, over time, become a new way to create brand and dealer loyalty.

 

Creating a More Engaging Experience

The most popular features of connected services all endeavor to heighten the direct level of interaction between the driver and the vehicle. That said, it’s the table stakes of the driving experience – things like roadside assistance and navigation – that are seen as most valuable in an OEM app. Though in-vehicle messaging and music streaming are innovative, they rank near the bottom of the survey because they’re not as essential to bringing the driver closer to the automobile as things like maintenance alerts, remote lock/unlock or remote engine start. So it’s not surprising that features that offer the convenience of interacting with the car from a remote location or help to improve the experience with the car, rank near the top.

When asked to be futurists, survey respondents said they hoped that future enhancements to OEM apps would include things like notifications, remote climate control, personalized cabin preparation or remote access to onboard cameras.

 

App School 101

Those same salespeople who first introduced the app to the consumer were also called upon to train consumers on their use. Though we cannot draw a conclusion about the effectiveness of salesperson-led training, it’s noteworthy that nearly the same amount of those surveyed opted to educate themselves about the app outside of the dealership. This underscores the importance of making training materials easily available online, so consumers can bone up at their leisure.

 

Reinventing the Customer Relationship

By using the app training experience as another touchpoint toward personalization of the vehicle to the owner’s individual tastes, dealers can build a better relationship between the buyer and the dealership itself. Hence, the new offerings of connected services provide the dealerships with a unique window of opportunity to reinvent the relationship with their customers by focusing on the engagement with the vehicle rather than focusing on just the vehicle itself.

If dealerships can move away from the transaction mindset and, instead, help create a personal relationship between the customer and the vehicle, then dealerships themselves have the opportunity to create a personalized retail experience. They can then better retain their customers outside of warranty lifespan and the relatively long period of time in-between the next car purchase.

 

Delivering Satisfaction

OEM apps tend to receive the best ratings from drivers who have integrated the apps into their routine. A strong majority of drivers surveyed responded that they are very satisfied with the usage of OEM apps, while a very small minority reported not being satisfied at all with the app usage. As OEM app usage is adopted at a greater level, and the insight provided by current users is ascertained and acted on for future feature development, OEM apps can heighten the level of satisfaction and, as a result, increase the loyalty to the brand.

So, how will the market ultimately embrace OEM apps? As our survey indicates, having a deep and detailed understanding of the digital experience – and the role OEM apps can play in helping to personalize this experience – represents the best pathway to success. Although the adoption of connected services may become more prevalent over time, OEMs and dealers will experience faster and more profitable growth if they understand how to bring the consumer into a level of personalization with the apps. This, in turn, will bring consumers closer to the automobile, and create a more satisfied mobility experience inside and outside of the car.

If we can help you to better understand consumer habits around connected vehicle technology, please give us a call.

Corey Reiter & Stephan Schroeder, Morpace Automotive

 

*The data collected by the Morpace Automotive Consumer Pulse Study are weighted to ensure relevant demographic characteristics of the sample matched those of the U.S. general population.  All respondents are weighted to U.S. Census Bureau demographic profiles for the U.S. population 18+ on gender, age, income and ethnicity.

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12
Dec

Autonomy, Delayed: Four Reasons Why Millennials May Not Be Ready For Self-Driving Cars

An Autonomous Future Series: For automobile manufacturers, suppliers, and technology companies, a bold new future has arrived. Technology that adds autonomous features to the driving experience are now available on vehicles by all major manufacturers – inching us ever closer to the day where the driver is a passive, rather than active, participant in the driving experience. To take a closer look at what’s to come, automotive research experts from Market Strategies-Morpace will share their insights in an occasional blog series titled “An Autonomous Future.” In this blog, Dania Rich-Spencer and Stephan Schroeder, Automotive Vice Presidents at Market Strategies-Morpace, share insights about why a consumer panel of millennials do not trust self-driving vehicles and, therefore, would not step foot inside one.

By: Dania Rich-Spencer & Stephan Schroeder – Vice Presidents, Automotive Growth & Innovation

 

To say that autonomous vehicle technology is top of mind for auto manufacturers is a slight understatement.

Across the globe, carmakers are doubling and tripling down on features that will take the power of the driving experience out of the often-unpredictable hands of the car owner, and into the relative algorithmic safety of computer-driven vehicular tech. According to a Brookings Institute study, manufacturers spent more than $80 billion on engineering AV technologies for their cars in 2017. In fact, a majority of this year’s models have incorporated one or more autonomous features — things like lane departure warnings, automated braking, and radar-enabled cruise control.

Framed against this reality, it would be easy to expect that a hands-off future is all but assured. In fact, at the recent ADAS & Autonomous Vehicle USA Conference, engineers spent two days talking about continued refinements that will assure the public’s safety. During one session, in fact, engineers discussed with pride spending considerable resources to understand how many times a pedestrian looks before entering a crosswalk.

So it was surprising — indeed, shocking — to observe these same engineers shift in their seats during a consumer panel discussion facilitated by Suzanne Miller of Morpace on Day 2. During the discussion, five millennials — without hesitating — answered “No” to the most fundamental of questions: “Would you step foot inside an autonomous vehicle?

Though the response was for some a harsh reminder of the consumer challenges that still have to be solved, the question of trust is not a new one — in fact, a poll released earlier this year by the American Automobile Association found that 73 percent of those surveyed are “too afraid” to enter a self-driving car. This is up 10 percentage points from the year prior, and underscores the biggest hurdle facing AV and ADAS tech — one that cannot simply be funded or engineered away.

As we listened to the panelists — varying in background, gender, nationality, and age — we were able to pinpoint:

The four most pervasive reasons why
there is skepticism and fear of self-driving vehicles

Trust and Safety

Topping the list is the overall belief that humans remain best suited to command the driving experience. They readily cite the isolated instances of accidents involving self-driving cars among the top reasons. In other transportation experiences where much of the process is automated – flying aboard a modern commercial jetliner, for instance – there always is a human who will reassuredly step in, they say, if something goes wrong.

The amount of engineering that underlies the self-driving experience, in itself, should be reassuring to the public. In fact, one audience member, in a fit of frustration, asked rhetorically why these people would “rather trust an Uber driver than a well-engineered AV?” Interestingly, panelists cited the number of high ratings and successfully completed journeys on an Uber driver’s profile as affirmation that they know what they’re doing. Something that is not readily available for autonomous vehicles today but may be required to convince consumers of its safety in the future.

It was compelling to hear this from a group that has developed a “learned trust” – a sort of symbiotic relationship – with existing driving tech. This is a public that would not commute beyond their neighborhood without some form of a moving map (trusting its computer-intoned directions implicitly as they are uttered from the dash or smartphone).  But it’s a group that has also learned how flawed technology can be – how imperfect it is at times. They have coped with taking their new $1,000 iPhone out of the box, only to find it doesn’t work. They deal with daily, inexplicable disruptions of their WiFi service. Because of these experiences, they have learned what the limits are to technology. As a result, they have developed a skepticism – and in some cases even fear – that only seems to grow with every new announcement about self-driving vehicles. This underscores the growing need to build consumer trust with the new technology as autonomous vehicles are continually developed.

 

Privacy

Millennials have had a love-hate relationship with the technology that guides their lives. On the one hand, dramatic improvements in tech have given this group more powerful tools and connectedness than ever; on the other, the personal information input into these devices and sites has been under assault. The specter that AV technology will further abridge someone’s privacy appears to be a deal breaker for those who would rather cruise in relative anonymity.

 

Hackers and Bad Actors

All the engineering in the world, said these panelists, cannot correct for the mental deficiencies of those who wish to illegally subvert the technology, or use it for harm. Fears include hacking of cars to disable features, or to use them for nefarious purposes; or some unstable driver inside an AV who uses it to wreak havoc on an unsuspecting public.

 

Liability

Panelists expressed grave concerns about who would ultimately be held responsible for accidents involving AV tech. If I was not steering the car when it hit that pedestrian, why should I be held responsible for the damage inflicted? Sorting out the chain of liability – whether the mobility provider should offer some sort of supplemental insurance for its self-driving technology, or whether the public, through the act of purchasing or renting the car, should remain the liable party – was a clear precondition of their risk/reward decision about this new technology.

 

Given what we learned from a group of smart, articulate millennials, AV manufacturers will need to deliberately guide consumers down the path to a world of autonomous vehicles – on consumers’ terms. Challenges associated with this include: 1) understanding exactly what these terms are, and 2) responding in an empathic manner to meet consumers’ expectations. Conquering these challenges may well represent the Holy Grail between reticence and broad adoption.

At Market StrategiesMorpace, we are working with vehicle manufacturers and technology companies to better understand the human factors that will ultimately lead to a future of new, safe, and widely accepted modes of transportation. If we can be of service, please contact us.

Dania Rich-Spencer & Stephan Schroeder – Vice Presidents, Automotive Growth & Innovation

 

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