8
Sep

Is Autonomy Happening Too Fast?

Is autonomy happening too fast?

By: Greg Swando, Senior Research Director

While automotive manufacturers across the globe work feverishly to equip their current automotive line with the latest Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS), and some even striving for full autonomy as early as 2020, how are consumers reacting to this new technology?

We’ve published a new study on consumer sentiments toward autonomous driving technologies and among the findings we learned that up to 50 percent of U.S. drivers that own vehicles equipped with driver assistance systems are turning them off.

Why? According to consumers it’s because some feel they are more confident in their own abilities to anticipate emergency situations.  Others find the warnings and audible alerts to be annoying. Several consumers don’t fully trust some of the ADAS technologies that are now being incorporated, while others may not even be aware whether or not they own the features.

At the same time, there are segments of consumers seeking out ADAS features and excitedly look forward to the day of a fully autonomous vehicle. These consumers are ready, and willing to put full their trust in the current technology—but is the technology ready to be trusted? Take a look at the recent Tesla Autopilot crash. We believe that one of the outcomes of our study is that consumers need to be educated on how these features work, why they’re needed, and how they can benefit from them.

While OEMs are planning to increase their investments and marketing spend toward fully autonomous vehicles within the next 10 years, consumers need to feel better prepared to drive these vehicles than they are today. Such consumer education is key to not only getting the public to trust the new features, but to also use them properly so that accidents, like the recent Tesla one, can be avoided.

Our study, A Consumer Centric Journey Toward Autonomy, highlights customer opinions and experiences—both good and bad—when it comes to autonomous features, and found various consumer personas that will shape future autonomous vehicle adoption. These findings will help OEMs and suppliers better understand the consumer and their relationship to new autonomous technology, preventing the consumer from feeling autonomy is being adopted too quickly.

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16
Jun

Top 3 Reasons Why Consumers are Rejecting Autonomy

Top 3 reasons why consumers are rejecting autonomy

By: Greg Swando, Senior Research Director

Autonomy.

This one word is the beginning of the current automobile industry’s disruption, as OEMs across the world race to incorporate various levels of autonomy and services into their vehicles.  New features such as Forward Collision Warning, Lane Keeping Assistance, and Emergency Braking, among others, have been emerging on the market and becoming more commonplace across vehicle portfolios and advertising campaigns.

But what exactly do consumers think about these new Automated Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS)?

While today’s consumers will see more advances in vehicle technology over the next five years than in the past 50, their rate of technology adoption may be slower to respond, as found by the report “A Consumer-Centric Journey Towards Autonomy”. This report was developed by our automotive team in partnership with SBD and Gamivation, in order to understand the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead in the journey toward next generation autonomous vehicles.

Our report revealed that there are 3 main reasons consumers are not only nervous about the new ADAS features, but may also be rejecting them entirely:

  1. Today’s driver assistance systems are being underutilized and/or misunderstood
  2. A significant number of current ADAS owners find the technology distracting and even irritating
  3. Many consumers reject needing any assistance–and are against giving up control of their vehicle

These and other surprising insights were revealed through the study, including how consumers are viewing the implementation and use of current ADAS features in vehicles. The types of consumers most open and receptive to these features, and those who are more likely to be suspicious or frightened by the new technology, are also revealed in the report, along with why consumers are reacting in these ways.

Our Automotive team and partners will help you learn how your competitors are implementing autonomous features and compare and contrast consumer viewpoints among each of these systems. After determining these points, our team can map out best-practice guidelines to differentiate your features as part of your overall brand, and help to make the consumers’ transition to autonomous features a smoother ride.

To find out more about “A Consumer Centric Journey Towards Autonomy” click here.

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