8
Nov

Tactics For Humanizing Data From Connected Devices and IoT To Drive Business Outcomes

By Lucas Lowden, Research Director

Connected devices. Automation. Machine learning. Artificial intelligence.

Just a few short years ago, we would’ve thought we were watching a science fiction movie.

There is much discussion around these technologies – and for good reason! Each are critical components of scalable Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

Today, it is the reality of our day jobs. With the support of various functions across the organization, we are actively establishing Morpace’s thought leadership and positioning for what we believe will be the future of the market research industry.

In support of these technologies, the importance of the human element should not be discounted.

There are numerous human interactions that provide crucial inputs to enable successful automation of machine processes. Doing so allows for a broader understanding and application of big data to produce actionable insights for business outcomes.

With several years growing in this space, we have developed a passion about leveraging big data and IoT systems. We have also realized the importance of Big Context – the intersection of man and machine that layers contextual understanding and lends business meaning to these massive data systems.

Are you leveraging Big Context in your business? Are you finding the humanity within your organization’s data?

Join the Strategists on Morpace’s Growth & Innovation Team – Jason Mantel (Sr. VP), Dania Rich-Spencer (VP), and myself, Lucas Lowden (Research Director) – for our webinar from Qualtrics’ Experience Week, Big Context: Humanizing Big Data From Connected Devices” and learn about tactics for driving positive business outcomes. To sign up and view our webinar, click here.

In the webinar, we explore the tenants of Big Context and how we have proven the importance of the human element and answering the question “Why?” for an automotive manufacturer and a transportation & logistics fleet.

We encourage you to reach out to us directly for any questions or further discussion around humanizing your organizations’ data at information@morpace.com.

 

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7
Feb

Patient Experience: When Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast


By Debra Fin
Vice President

This provocative statement is attributable to Peter Drucker, widely regarded as the father of modern management thinking. In healthcare, strategy can be devoured by culture’s hunger for maintaining the status quo especially with the relentless pace of change occurring in the industry.

Culture is the way of life for a group of people–the behaviors, beliefs, values, and symbols that they accept, generally without thinking about them, and that are passed along by communication and imitation from one generation to the next. You know culture when you hear hospital employees state, “We don’t do it like that here” or management talks about “our way of thinking”. Culture is the soul and traditions of an organization and, most often, the obstacle to embracing change that focuses on the customer.

C-suite directives to improve customer centricity and focus on improvement of the patient’s experience can authorize CX leaders to gather patient data, hold focus groups and build touchpoint roadmaps. Armed with these insights and tools, operational changes are recommended, communications are built and new services are rolled-out all in an effort to meet the expectations of future patients, improve metrics and increase revenue. Everyone from Administration to Housekeeping waits to hear that patient experience has improved.

Only to find out that the culture on 3West devoured breakfast and is on its’ way through lunch!

Changing the structure, staffing and services of the organization will not suffice to improve patient experience based on patient insights alone. As our most recent Patient Experience case study demonstrates, the culture and values of the organization and its’ employee voices are vital to understanding how to meet the needs and expectations of patients. Equal time must be spent clarifying values, needs, and expectations at both the customer level and at the organization’s human capital level.

Engaging employees is as important as engaging the patient population. Doing both gives you a better eco-system view on how to achieve better service, meet expectations and empower employees to satisfy patients and families. Employees are the engine that delivers on your brand promise by meeting the expectations that define excellent patient experience.

Market research gathering employee insights and reactions to the ideas and expectations of patients can identify the barriers and best practices to delivering on a best in-class patient experience. Employees know how things really work and how to get things done; they can identify where the collaboration chain breaks down in bed scheduling and what families of inpatients really need. Best of all, collectively they have many solutions to improving their patient’s experience and want to be instrumental in creating both better health and better customer loyalty. All you need to do is ask them.

Armed with this 360° view, cultural mores and traditions can be addressed and both the patient and the hospital employee are equal partners in designing the patient experience solution.

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10
Dec

Hospital Patients Have an Opinion About Patient Surveys

couple reviewing

By: Debra Fin, Vice President; Jennifer Brown, Research Director

Hospital patients who have had a recent inpatient stay have something to share about the patient satisfaction surveys they receive.

Change the methodology please!!!

How do we know?

Morpace conducts a monthly random survey of the American population 18 years and older exploring consumer preferences and trends across all 50 states in our Omnibus Survey. A minimum of 1,000 individuals from our online panel complete a variety of questions and share their demographics with us. From April to September 2015, we collected more than 6,000 responses and got an interesting viewpoint from the population who has had a recent hospital inpatient stay.

Survey Participation is High

12% of 701 people shared that they had been a hospital inpatient in the past six months. A whopping 69% (482 people) of those had been asked to conduct a patient satisfaction survey! More than half, 53%, completed a paper survey they had received through the mail.  This is not surprising since this has been the traditional way to solicit opinions from discharged patients for decades. Our data suggests that online surveying appears to be growing with more than 20% reporting completing a survey via computer, tablet, or mobile phone.

Online Surveys Are Preferred

Hospital patients are very clear in their preferences of how they would like to complete a survey. If given the choice on what method to use to give feedback to a hospital provider, more than 59% of the total sample would choose to complete a survey online with a computer, tablet, or mobile phone. A mail option garnered less than a third of the preference vote. Moreover, 14% would really rather not be surveyed!

HC Survey admin

Those respondents showing higher preference for completing an online survey are white females in higher income brackets with insurance through their employer or spouse. Hispanic and African American respondents indicated a stronger preference for mobile surveys. When we looked at the 65 plus population, they too indicated a preference for online survey completion versus mail (55% vs. 43%).

Back To The Future….

When we looked at combining response choices for administering surveys before discharge, we saw something very interesting.  Almost one quarter of respondents would prefer to complete a survey before discharge! The most popular choice was still a paper survey with a computer or tablet coming in second. It would be interesting to pilot administering patient surveys before discharge using a variety of methods.

Most of us fill out online surveys for other things we consume, why not healthcare services?  The times they are a’changing…

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8
Dec

Mobile Fitness Apps – Adoption Not so Healthy

mobile-fitness

By: Debra Fin, Vice President; Jennifer Brown, Research Director

Given all the advertising, you would think that everyone, and I mean everyone, is using a fitness or health and wellness app to organize or track his or her every step, pill, or healthcare encounter. Not so much.

In fact, much of that advertising seems to be heard by one distinct segment.

How do we know?

Morpace conducts a monthly random survey of the American population 18 years and older exploring consumer preferences and trends across all 50 states in our Omnibus Survey. A minimum of 1,000 individuals from Morpace’s online panel complete a variety of questions and share their demographics with us. From April 2015 to September 2015, we collected more than 6,000 responses to questions about health and wellness apps and got an interesting view of the population who has used a mobile app.

The NOs Have It

A full six out of ten of all respondents have not used an app for health and fitness activities in the last six months. These individuals are likely to be Caucasian males, 55 years or older and have an annual income of $50,000 or less. They are likely to have Medicare or no health insurance coverage.

HC app use 1

Of the total sample, only 18% are using apps to track their exercise/activity level and/or calories burned.  Those tracking weight (13%) and calorie (12.9%) intake come in a close second and third.

When we asked if our respondents would use a mobile app in the future for healthcare related activities, we got a similar picture. Over half (58%) did not see themselves using a mobile app for healthcare related tasks in the future. A significantly higher proportion of these respondents are the same group that has not used one—older white males. This group is known to be highly resistant to health related behavior change.

The Sweet Spot

So who is using these apps?

Females 18-34 years old are those likely to use a mobile app for health care related tasks. A significant proportion of these women has a household income of $100,000 or more and has insurance through their employer or spouse. These individuals are likely already engaged in health and wellness activities and have the financial and lifestyle means to pursue activities supporting fitness, including smartphones, club memberships, fitness gear, and such.

HC app use 2

The Kicker

Improving health…it is about knowing and doing those things that contribute to better health. It is all about behavior change. If mobile apps are to be a part of the solution to better health, then they have to be attractive enough to encourage wide scale adoption.

You can lead a horse to water…but can you get them to use mobile fitness apps?

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2
Dec

The Email Conundrum for Health Plans

Concept image of modern communication

By: Debra Fin, Vice President; Jennifer Brown, Research Director

The Email Conundrum for Health Plans

If you think about how you last received information from your health plan, I am sure it came in a box, the mailbox.

However, when Morpace asked health plan members how they would prefer to receive health plan communications they were clear—Email 63% of the time!

Hmmmm…what gives??

Morpace conducts a monthly random survey of the American population 18 years and older, exploring consumer preferences and trends across all 50 states in our Omnibus Survey. A minimum of 1,000 individuals from our online panel complete a variety of questions and share their demographics with us. From April to September 2015, we collected more than 5,400 responses to questions about health plan information for members. We learned about their preferences for receiving both health and wellness and benefits and claims information and compared that to what we have learned from working with over 200 health plans.

Addresses are hard to get

Depending on the plan type, we consistently hear that health plan member postal addresses are constantly changing. We live in a mobile society. In 2014, more than 28 million people 16 and older changed residence in the United States. When Morpace conducts health plan surveys we must update health plan and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid data records for addresses and phone numbers using specialized vendors. We do this to maximize response rates by making every attempt to ensure we deliver our surveys and reach health plan members by phone.

Even after updating these data files, up to 11% of records are found to be incorrect after implementing the mail and phone protocols! Medicaid beneficiaries are a mobile population and both mailing addresses and phone numbers change frequently. Medicare beneficiaries age out of their own home into a family member’s home or into a skilled facility. Working adults change jobs, changes homes, move away.

How do you stay in touch?

You’ve got mail….

Email addresses are stable contact sources for most individuals existing independently of their owner’s physical location. I moved from Michigan to Tennessee and back again in a four year span, and had the same email address covering three postal addresses!

Email may be the perfect solution for many and health plan members agree. When our Omnibus Survey participants were asked how they would prefer to receive information about wellness and health services from their health plan 63% said email, and 45% said mail. When we differentiated the material type by information about benefits and claims, email remained the stronger preference versus postal mail (61% vs. 52%).

HC survey receive

Respondents in the Morpace Omnibus Survey who preferred email are typically enrolled in Commercial insurance, younger than 55 years old, have a higher household income, and live in the western United States. Those respondents with strongest preference for mail are 55 plus, African American females with incomes less than $50,000, and have government insurance.

Medicare beneficiaries prefer mail as their first choice for both types of materials, although for wellness materials there was not a significant difference for mail versus email receipt. According to the Pew Research Center studies, 61% of Americans over 65 are online. Therefore, we know seniors are using the web. However, the strongest preference for mail versus email was for benefits and claims materials. We suspect that the increased preference for postal mail with benefits and claims items is related to these being personalized communications on issues affecting their pocketbooks.

Yet, many seniors in our focus groups will tell us that they are inundated with direct mail that they throw out since it may not be addressing a need they have right then.

Websites scored at a consistent preference level of 27% for both health and wellness materials and claims and benefits communications. However, our anecdotal information from working with many plans is that members rarely use their health plan’s website. Moreover, we know from talking with health plan members, they often find plan websites tough to navigate. Many, who are digitally savvy, do go to plan websites and cannot find what they want, then go to the phone and call customer service. This can result in a plan representative getting a frustrated member on the line thus creating a service recovery challenge. Dissatisfied members are more likely to rate the plan lower in their overall satisfaction.

So why not email all plan communications?

Email addresses are hard to get. In addition, not all plan members are online. One health plan client let us know that their data system does not have a field to capture information, others cited low response rates when requesting emails, and yet another has talked about legal issues. Privacy concerns and spam emails are often cited as the reasons members choose not to provide their email address.

However, as mailing costs go up and known waste of direct mailed publications increases, the use of email and customer portals becomes an attractive alternative for both health plans and their members. As a result, arming your customer service representatives with training and the idea of collecting emails for future use becomes more important.

By targeting your communications to the channel preferred by members, you can more successfully engage them. Health plan members who can assess information quickly are more likely to have a better experience with the plan and higher plan satisfaction.

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