15
Nov

Shared Decision-Making about Treatment Improves Member Experience

By: Linda Sookman, Behavioral Health Quality and Accreditation Consultant at Morpace

Today’s healthcare environment has given rise to different clinical approaches to care, and how healthcare is delivered. No longer is the patient merely a recipient of medical care – today, they are a vocal partner and participant in the initiatives that will help them lead healthier lives. This has made it critically important that healthcare organizations transform their approach to their members, or risk losing ground to more progressive plans.

Within the last half-generation, we’ve seen this patient-centric philosophy result in the creation of initiatives such as patient-centered medical homes, integrated medical and behavioral health treatment, and the incorporation of community resources. All of these evolutions are the result of a mindset that social determinants critical in ensuring that comprehensive treatment plans are developed with the individual’s needs in mind.

This effort has closed the gap between patient and professional. Between February and March 2018, the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions reported in a survey of adults that an awareness and use of national quality rating tools, and innovations such as wearable tracking devices, have indeed helped to improve the public’s perception about their engagement in treatment.

At the focal point of all of this new activity that supports the necessity of an individual’s engagement in their healthcare treatment, is shared decision-making – a trend I, and my colleagues here at Morpace, have been tracking for some time.

An article published by the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, “How Much Shared Decision Making Occurs in Usual Primary Care of Depression?,” defines shared decision-making as “a collaborative process that allows patients and their providers to make health care decisions together, taking into account the best scientific evidence available, as well as the patient’s values and preferences.”

Researchers found that the impact of shared decision-making between healthcare providers and their patients leads to an improvement in members’ experiences, as well as their overall satisfaction with the treatment received. It was found that individuals who participated and engaged in their treatment gained a higher level of satisfaction than such variables as gender, education level, and/or the total visits they received.

The National Quality Forum (NQF), in conjunction with its National Quality Partners Shared Decision Making Action Team, issued a national call to action to support and incorporate shared decision-making as a standard of clinical practice. The National Quality Partners Team recommended applying the following strategies.

  1. Promote leadership and culture. The success or failure of incorporating shared decision-making into a standard of clinical practice is wholly dependent on the leadership of the organization. Strong leadership impacts the integration of shared decision-making into the culture of the organization.
  2. Enhance patient education and engagement. Practice leaders must take an active role in informing members and their families about the importance of shared decision-making to promote their engagement in treatment. This helps keep the health literacy of patient populations at the forefront.
  3. Provide your healthcare team with knowledge and training. Teams and providers should be coached on the specifics of improving communication with members and their families. This will result in a greater focus on members’ preferences, beliefs, and objectives for treatment. A better understanding of members’ treatment needs, and a discussion of treatment options, can nurture mutual respect and trust.
  4. Take concrete actions. Integrating decision-making tools into healthcare team processes leads to improved efficiency when communicating with members. AHRQ published a variety of clinical decision-making resources at particular points during the members’ treatment. The organization recommends the deployment of clinical decision-making tools based on particular illnesses, specific member populations, preventive health reminders, or notifications that may impact member safety.
  5. Track, monitor, and report. Providers should offer an update on shared decision-making outcomes and member self-reported experiences with organizational leaders, clinical teams, members, and providers.
  6. Establish accountability. Such activity should now become a permanent fixture in the practice’s annual Quality Improvement Program and Work Plan. This should include shared decision-making goals, objectives, and processes, and assignments of team accountability.

The integration of shared decision-making into clinical practice is no longer an option. It is has taken a prominent focus in healthcare policy-making, healthcare quality payment models, healthcare delivery, and with healthcare consumers. I personally believe that adopting such a stance proactively can be measured in much more than the bottom line (though revenue growth, too, is a tidy benefit of being proactive).

My colleagues here at Morpace have the expertise and innovation to assess shared decision-making practices and to recommend strategies that will improve members’ experiences. Morpace can partner with relevant stakeholders to design research projects that assess members’ experience and outcomes, and execute a closed-loop protocol to assure integration of results.

If you would like to discuss this further, or have any questions, please contact me at 248-756-0532 or lsookman@morpace.com.

Linda Sookman, RN, BSN, CPHQ, Lean Six Sigma Green Belt, is the Behavioral Health Quality and Accreditation Consultant at Morpace.

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7
Nov

An Autonomous Future – Electric Vehicle Driver Opinion on Autonomous Vehicles

Autonomous connected electric vehicles


For automobile manufacturers, a bold new future has arrived. Technology that adds autonomous features to the driving experience are now available on vehicles by all major manufacturers – inching us ever closer to the day where the driver is a passive, rather than active, participant in the driving experience. To take a closer look at what’s to come, automotive research experts from Market Strategies-Morpace will share their insights in an occasional blog series titled “An Autonomous Future.” In this blog, Stephan Schroeder, Vice President of Automotive Business Development at Market Strategies-Morpace, shares insights about how electric and hybrid vehicle drivers view the advantages and disadvantages of autonomous vehicles.

By: Stephan Schroeder, Vice President of Business Development, Automotive

The prospect of autonomous driving and connected mobility has energized the automotive industry and spurred billions of dollars of investments in autonomy, connectivity, and electrification. While startups and blue-chip corporations alike are convinced about the potential of autonomous vehicles (AV), consumers are more incredulous.

As previously reported in our An Autonomous Future series (Consumer Awareness & Opinion and The Role of the Consumer), media coverage has and will play a critical role in creating driver and rider awareness for AVs, but it is also becoming clear that the transition to this new form of mobility will require a multifaceted approach and unprecedented levels of investment in order to earn their trust.

One group that appears to be further along in their favorable opinion towards autonomous driving are drivers of electric vehicles. In a recent Morpace MyDrivingPower* online survey conducted among over 100 electric vehicle drivers, 3 out of 4 respondents expressed a “very positive” or “somewhat positive” opinion about AVs, more than twice the rate reported by drivers of vehicles with traditional powertrains. Given that difference in favorable opinions and their unique vantage point as early adopters, we took a closer look at the pros and cons of autonomous driving from their perspective.

 

Electric Vehicle Drivers’ Worry Revolves Around AV Tech-Related Challenges

Maybe not surprisingly, the biggest concern has to do with the technology itself. Concerns range from the quality of programming and the risk of being hacked to the inability of drivers to “program” the cars correctly.

And herein lies maybe the biggest challenge for AVs. We all have, over decades, become used to the limits of technology and the fact that it is not fail safe. However, we have accepted this risk because either our lives don’t depend on it (i.e. cell phones, computers, etc.) or because we have experts standing by to jump in if necessary (i.e. pilots, doctors, etc.). When a simple system reboot does not suffice or experts are not physically available, we dial help lines and call upon customer support to aid in our problems.

However, when it comes to AVs: what would happen in the event of an emergency or failure? The thought of being stranded with your family by the roadside and having to navigate through a helpdesk menu or wait hours for a call back is not something that would be acceptable in an autonomous world. Overcoming the doubts about the reliability of the technology and providing a highly responsive, end-user support system will be the two biggest hurdles that mobility providers will have to overcome to gain broad acceptance among consumers.

The next largest challenge has to do with concerns regarding vehicle performance due to bad weather conditions. Additional performance-related comments had to do with poor road conditions or construction. Of course, there is also the question of performance in more demanding environments, such as off-roading, which interestingly enough leads to a related disadvantage mentioned in another category: the thought of having to give up driving and losing the joy of driving a car. Many drivers are not happy about the thought of losing their freedom to drive or the ability to drive themselves.

While less frequent, concerns about liability and data privacy are also weighing heavy on the minds of consumers. Both of these issues tie back to our experience with technology. Who will be responsible in the event of an accident? What damages will be covered and not covered? Who will be responsible for the condition of the vehicle, especially if it is being shared amongst multiple parties? Ironically, some respondents felt that there would actually be more accidents because they did not trust their fellow drivers to behave responsibly or manage the technology properly.

The fear of lack of data privacy points to another significant concern with AVs. Considering the amount of time we spend in our cars and the amount of interaction that will take place through text, voice, video, sensing, etc., AVs will take the question of data privacy to a whole new level. Morpace is planning to explore this and other issues related to the question of trust and autonomous mobility further in one of its upcoming studies.

 

Electric Vehicle Drivers’ Opinion of AV Advantages

When asked about the expected advantages of AVs, electric vehicle drivers have a wide range of expectations, from safety to cost and environmental issues.

Most notably, electric vehicle drivers expect fewer accidents due to a reduction in distractions or unsafe driving. Furthermore, they expect lower cost of insurance, which could be a function of less accidents but also a lower rate of car ownership.

While many also expect less traffic and lower emissions, the verdict for a majority of people is still out, which shows the uncertainty around certain benefits:

  • Will AV lead to less or more cars on the road?
  • Which powertrain technology will prevail?
  • What will be the mix of autonomous and non-autonomous vehicles?

While many people believe that there will be efficiencies due to the use of autonomous vehicles (i.e. faster commutes), it could be offset by higher traffic volumes or the expectation that “the slowest car will dictate speed on the road.”

Finally, electric vehicle drivers pointed out two more major advantages. First, they noted that AVs will provide options for people who either can’t drive due to age, health, income or legal reasons – or who simply don’t want to drive. Secondly, many consumers mentioned that they expect a reduction in stress and greater happiness, which will contribute to a better quality of life and increased productiveness. The luxury of permanently “being taxied by your own car,” as one responded put it, seems to be a very appealing benefit for many drivers.

As a result, when asked how likely they would consider riding in an AV, 72% of electric vehicle drivers said that they would be “very likely “or “somewhat likely” to do so.

 

Time Spent While Driving in AV

For those with the most positive opinion of AVs, what else do they think and feel? When asked what they would do during the drive, the majority of drivers said they would use it to socialize with others, inside or outside of the vehicle, or simply make good use of the time otherwise. That said, many of the comments also revealed the anxiety that electric vehicle drivers feel when it comes to technology. Their comments ranged from “nervously watch the traffic/road,” to “carefully monitor the technology” and “pay full attention to driving and be completely ready to take over controls.”  In other words, while many drivers dream of a more enjoyable and fun ride, they simply can’t imagine a vehicle performing 100% of their activities 100% of the time with 0% failure yet.

 

AV Price Points for Electric Vehicle Driver

So, given all of the pros and cons, how much more would electric vehicle drivers be willing to spend for a vehicle that has autonomous technology?

On average, electric vehicle drivers indicated that they would be willing to pay an additional $6,000, with answers ranging from $1000 at the low end to $10,000 at the upper end.

The bottom-line is that the automotive industry has the attention of electric vehicle drivers and they are willing to pay for the added value. That said, the expectations are high and there is a healthy level of skepticism about the ability of making the technology work. The promise of a better quality of life is a huge opportunity for everyone involved but it will most likely come in baby steps as we learn to feel our way around the new world of unlimited mobility for everyone.

For more information about our AV research or if you have questions, please contact me and visit morpace.com.

 

*MyDrivingPower is an Insight Community comprised of over 500 electric and hybrid vehicle owners across the U.S., which is managed by the automotive market research professionals at Morpace. Results are based on responses from BEV and PHEV vehicles owners only.

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